State by State – The A.T. in Vermont

 

HikeItForward-Final-MediumThe Appalachian Trail covers 150 miles in Vermont (The Green Mountain State). About 100 miles of the trail (in the southern part of the state) coincides with the Long Trail and travels along the crest of the rugged and aptly named Green Mountains.  The Long Trail was the first long distance hiking trail in the USA (conceived in 1910 by James P. Taylor, construction began in 1912 with trail completion in 1930).  The Long Trail travels about 272 miles running the length of the state of Vermont. It starts at the Massachusetts border near Williamstown, and runs north into Canada. I’ve got to be careful at the northern junction of the AT and the LT or I might end up in Mansonville, Canada (75 miles east of Montreal). What a shock to get up one morning and see the borderline into Canada. ). I would love to see Canada, but that would be a major wrong turn.

I noticed that there are quite of few shelters in Vermont. Counting them in my AT Guide I discovered 27 shelters along the 150 miles of trail (that’s a shelter every 5 ½ miles or so) – lots of sleeping options and nice spots for lunch even in the rain. There are also some communities close to the trail although most are 5 to 10 miles from the trailhead. Two towns close enough to hike to without hitch-hiking are Killington (mile 1,700), 0.6 miles to the east and West Hartford (mile 1,733), just 0.3 miles to the east of the path. These two towns are definitely on my stop list.

There are lots of beautiful spots along the trail in Vermont. One of them is Stratton Mountain, Vermont (NOBO mile 1,634) weighing in at 3,936 feet. This mountain can claim to be the birthplace of the Appalachian Trail. Benton MacKaye, who first published a proposal for the creation of the AT is thought to have developed his vision for the trail during a hike on this mountain. I thought I would just include some pictures to help communicate the beauty of the Green Mountain State.

Baker Peak

Baker Peak

Clarendon Gorg

Clarendon Gorge

 

Killington Peak

Killington Peak

 

Vermont. Stratton Pond

Stratton Pond

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stratton Mountain

Stratton Mountain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo: Baker Peak : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Trail#See_also

Photo: Cairns at White Rocks Cliff http://whereswalden.com/2009/04/11/rutland-vt-to-bennington-vt-hiker-feed/

Photo: Killington Peak http://killingtonlinks.com/index1.html

Photo: Stratton Pond http://www.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?id=695731&back=1

Photo: Stratton Mountain http://wandermelon.com/2010/06/01/stratton-mountain%E2%80%94summer-fun-in-vermont/

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Backpack, Hiking, Shelter, Thru-Hike, Trail, Vermont | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “State by State – The A.T. in Vermont

  1. janloyd

    Dave

    How long will you be hiking? You probably said that in a earlier post, but I’ve forgotten. Will you be “receiving visitors” along the way? I was just wondering where you might be toward the end of July, early August. We may be out east and south (the Cove, Asheville NC) &/or NJ, DE, (Blue Ridge Mtns)? Nothing totally set yet…just wondering 🙂

    Jan

    • Jan,

      I hope to make the hike in 120 days. This may be too aggressive and it might turn into 150 days. But if I am able to keep a 120 day pace, I would hope to be at the Massachusetts/Vermont border around the middle of July and climbing Mount Washington during the first full week of August. This may be too far north for you but I would love to meet and share some time with you and John.

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