Georgia

2019 in 2019: Week 19

Week 19 was a great week for dancing and driving but a lousy week for logging walking miles Rocky and I drove to Atlanta, Georgia this past week and spent some time with our eldest son, his beautiful wife and marvelous trio of children (two daughters and one son). Our early December trip was fueled by the girl’s ballet performance of the Nutcracker. The ballet was filled with colorful costumes and graceful choreography, and of course, the girls were utterly fantastic. We so enjoyed our time with the family and it is always encouraging to talk to my son. He is such a godly young man and an outstanding leader with Compassion International.

Ducks in December

Springboro was dusted with snow on Wednesday (December 5) and Thursday (the 6th), but I was able to take two average hikes before we left for Georgia on Friday morning. So, my total this week was 12.41 miles a full 26.4 miles shy of the minimum 38.83 miles needed each week to complete my challenge of hiking 2,019 miles before July 31, 2019. I anticipated that I would have weeks of vacation and times when walking would be minimalized so I had planned for such low mileage. Fortunately, I have been walking more than average for the past several weeks and have been able to bank 123 extra miles over the minimum. This lean week of only 12.41 miles cut my excess down to 97.25 miles, but the dozen miles of Week 19 brought my total miles to 835. I hope to replace some of my lost miles this week – the weather looks fairly mild and my schedule might permit several hours each day to exercise.

Categories: 2019 in 2019, Georgia, Local Hikes, Ohio, Rocky | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

That’s a Wrap

RTK on Katahdin

I started following 11 thru-hikers of the Appalachian Trail in February. Each of the hikers began their journey early. Most NOBO thru-hikers hit the trail in March and even early April. I wanted to see how the early birds did on the trail. Were they the birds that caught the worm, or did they become so discouraged by the cold, the snow, the slippery trail, and the loneliness that they exited the path for the more comfortable and less extreme?

Statistically, about 25% of all those who attempt a thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail complete the journey. Of the 14 thru-hikers that I followed 5 of them crossed the finish line for a success rate of 35.7%!

The summary chart below lists the hiker by his start date, followed by his end date (either the date he came off the trail or the date he summited Mount Katahdin). All the successful thru-hikes were NOBO attempts (Northbound: Hiking from Springer Mountain, GA to Mount Katahdin, Maine). The days on the trail ranged from 14 to 233 – ranging from 2 weeks to 7 and a half months. Those that completed the 14-state hike averaged 195 days. (I count myself so very blessed to have completed my hike in 154 days in 2014.) It is not a race (thank goodness) and my admiration with a loud ovation is lifted high to any individual who can conquer the challenges of the trail.

Hiker Start Date End Date # of Days Miles Miles/Day
Genesis 14-Jan 30-Apr 107 150 1.4
Zin Master 23-Jan 27-Feb 36 128.6 3.6
Hard Knocks 31-Jan 4-Jul 155 1817.9 11.7
Vagabond Jack 1-Feb 22-Jul 172 758.2 4.4
Opa 10-Feb 26-Sep 229 1690.8 7.4
Bamadog * 15-Feb 25-Aug 192 2190 11.4
Class Act 18-Feb 16-Mar 27 189 7.0
Chip Tillson * 20-Feb 10-Oct 233 2190 9.4
Sour Kraut * 21-Feb 25-Aug 186 2190 11.8
Next Step * 24-Feb 20-Aug 178 2190 12.3
RTK * 24-Feb 1-Sep 183 2190 12.0
David Snow 26-Feb 11-Mar 14 118.6 8.5
Hickory 27-Feb 17-Apr 50 731 14.6
Pigweed 27-Feb 25-Aug 180 1148.1 6.4

* Successfully Completed their Thru-hike

Bamadog on the Summit

So why did the hikers have to leave the trail? There were a variety of reasons given by the hikers on their online blogs.  Three of them did not give a reason, but rather just stopped posting their progress. One hiker changed his goal and decided to do a section hike instead. The other five pointed to a physical problem behind their need to exit the Appalachian Trail: one foot, one leg, one severe sickness, one debilitating medical condition, and one stated general fatigue plus his discouragement on his progress.

This year’s hike was filled with lots of rain, snow (for these early starters), and slick rocks/roots. It was a pleasure to follow their adventures and I congratulate each and every one of them. May the Appalachian Trail leave its mark on the heart of each hiker and may the lessons they learned be cemented in the minds for many years to come.

Thanks for joining me as we traveled the AT vicariously with these 14 brave, crazy, and bold adventurers of the class of 2018.

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Class of 2018, Georgia, Maine, Mount Katahdin, Thru-Hike | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

AT Hikers – First Week of August

Pigweeds’ View from Saddleback Mountain. ME

I have been following 14 adventurers on the Appalachian Trail. The only two things they have in common are they all started their thru-hike attempts during January or February and they are capturing their journeys online via trailjournals.com. Half of the original group have left the trail for various reason, while the other half are continuing their trek. A few are getting close to the finish line, while others have a pace that might make it difficult to complete the goal. With the average success rate of 25%, these early are still on track to better the average.

Unfortunately, I am removing Hard Knocks from an active status to inactive. He has not posted in his journal for over a month and 30 days of silence is my maximum for inclusion on the trail roster. I will continue to monitor Hard Knocks journal and let you know if he reappears or updates his status. His last was on July 4th from Franconia Notch, New Hampshire.

Bamadog on Mt. Washington

To my surprise, Bamadog has returned to the trail. He wrote in his journal on Jul 1st, Today is a bittersweet day but a good day. Psalm 118:24.As I hiked the Lord was speaking to my heart letting me know my wife needs me a lot more than the trail does. I did a very tough section over the Kinsman’s today 17 tough miles. Both of my knees are hurting letting me know I don’t need to be where I am alone scaling wet rock walls and cliffs and bouldering from daylight until dark. It is time to go home to my sweetheart.  I double checked his journal last week to discover that he had returned to the AT on July 22 where he left off (Franconia Notch) and as of August 3, he has hiked 116 miles in 13 days over the White Mountains and into the state of Maine. On the 3rd  of August Bamadog was in Andover, Maine with approximately 250 miles to Mount Katahdin.

Chip Tillson spent the night in Dalton, Massachusetts, on August 5th. Dalton is about 30 miles south of the Massachusetts/Vermont border, leaving Chip about 620 miles to complete his thru-hike. I am really cheering for Chip and truly hope he makes it to the big brown sign at the end of the adventure, but I am concerned for his pace. If he maintains his recent week’s speed of 11 the first week of October and the beginning of the snows that can easily close the trails to the summit of “the great mountain.”

Sour Kraut’s last photo was posted on July 21 from Mount Moosilauke, NH around 1,792 onto his hike with approximately 393 to go.

Next Step at Crocker Mountains

Next Step continues to make excellent progress on the trail. He entered the last state, the state of Maine, on July 29th and his last post (August 5th) shared that he was camped at Crocker Cirque Campsite, just shy of the 2,000-mile marker. Racewalker and I stayed at this camp along a beautiful stream in Maine on out 2014 thru-hike. Next Step has about 195 miles (including the 100 miles wilderness) to complete his adventure. He appears to be in a great position to finish strong and add his name to the class of 2018. He has the gorgeous Bigelow Mountains to enjoy, the canoe ride across the Kennebec River into Caratunk, ME, Moxie Bald Mountain, and the final town of Bronson, Maine, before he reaches the 100-Mile Wilderness.

RTK on Summit of Killington Peak

RTK ‘s last weekly post was published on July 24th and Bruce Matson, aka RTK, had hiked into West Hartford, Vermont, on VT 14. He has completed about 1,735 with approximately 455 miles to go. West Hartford is 30 miles south of the Vermont/New Hampshire border. RKT’s time frame looks spot on for a successful climb of Katahdin before the weather become a factor.

Pigweed is making a flip-flop attempt for his thru-hike. He hiked 800 miles to Buena Vista, Virginia, took several days off trail, then travel to Maine and has continued his hike southbound (SOBO). His last post (August 3) found him in Rangeley, Maine about 221 miles south of Katahdin. Combined with his 802 miles from Springer Mountain Georgia, Pigweed has hiked 1025 miles leaving another 1165 miles to complete the hike. Fortunately, Pigweed does not have the major winter snows to face in the weeks ahead, but his hike might stretch into an eight-month trip. I hope that Pigweed endures through southern Maine and New Hampshire. If he succeeds in traversing these miles, he has an excellent chance of completing his journey.

Categories: 100 Mile Wilderness, Appalachian Trail, Bamadog, Chip Tillson, Class of 2018, Dalton, MA, Georgia, Hard Knocks, Kennebec River, Killington Peak, Maine, Monson, ME, Mount Katahdin, Mount Washington, Pigweed, Racewalker, RTK, Sour Kraut, The Whites, Thru-Hike, Which Way and Next Step | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The AT Challenge – Day Two

Wildflower near Neels Gap

Rocky and I are in Georgia starting our 14-State Challenge. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy has established a 14-State Challenge to anyone interested in visiting all 14 states that make up the AT. Rocky and I have decided to take a week and hike a couple of hikes in the first four states beginning in Georgia, then North Carolina, followed by Tennessee, and ending our first section in Virginia.

Mountain Crossing at Neels Gap

We started yesterday (Sunday 6/17/18) at Amicalola Falls (the approach trail to the AT). We hiked to the top of the falls and enjoyed the incredible beauty of the cascading water. We then drove to Woody Gap and climbed to the summit of Big Cedar Mountain. With sore legs, we hopped into our car and drove to Dahlonega, GA, for a nice rest in a Quality Inn.

Today’s adventure took us a little further north on the AT to about mile-marker 31.7 and Neels Gap. Located at Neels Gap is Mountain Crossings, a full-service outfitter known for its gear shakedowns as they help thru-hikers eliminate excess weight from the backpacks and send the non-essentials back home. The Appalachian Trail goes right through the property owned by Mountain Crossing and actually travels through a covered porch attached to the outfitter, the only covered portion of the entire Appalachian Trail.

Rowdy at the porch at Neels Gap

We also found out as we entered their parking area that day hikers are not allowed to park there while the hike, so I had to drive almost a half a mile to another parking area. It was a nice warm-up for the 7.2-mile section to follow. Rocky and I started out just before 9:00 and thoroughly enjoyed our section hike over Levelland Mountain, down into Swaim Gap, back up to the summit of Wolf Laurel Top where we turned around and reversed our feet as we marched back to Neels Gap.

Fairy Village

The path was rocky and root-filled, but the adventure blossomed with a lush forest, beautiful skies (when you could see through the canopy), and a cool breeze to refresh our spirits. We drank lots of water as we conquered the challenging hills and dales. We logged 7.2 miles and experienced about 2,218 feet of elevation change. Rocky and I found some beautiful wildflowers, two huge snails, a fairy village created along the path, and several views breath-taking views. We spent some quality time in prayer remembering our friends and family as we worshiped the Creator of it all.

View from Wolf Laurel Top

After our hike, I retrieved that car and we visited the outfitter. We grabbed a refreshing drink and purchased a few bumper stickers for the car (we paid for the drinks, too). Before we left, we got our AT Passports stamped at the outfitters. Sliding into our chariot, we took off for Franklin, North Carolina, our home for the evening. We enjoyed a Wendy’s burger after checking into our motel. When we made reservations for the motel, it did not mention a swimming pool, but we noticed the pool as we pulled into the rest stop. Rocky opted not to take a swim, but I enjoyed to pool a great deal!

Swimming Pool at Franklin, NC

Tomorrow, we will be driving up US 64 to an AT crossing at Winding Stair Gap. We will be hiking SOBO (southbound) for 3.8 miles to Rock Gap Shelter, my camping spot on day seven of my 2014 thru-hike. I shared the shelter with Motown and Archangel, two of my kindred spirits on the trail. I look forward to reminiscing when we arrive.

Categories: 14-State Challenge, Appalachian Trail, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Georgia, Levelland Mountain, Neels Gap, North Carolina, Rocky, Rowdy, Wolf Laurel Top | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rocky and Rowdy on an AT Challenge

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy has issued a 14-State Challenge. Anyone brave enough to take the challenge is expected to hike at least a portion of the AT in all 14 states. Rocky and I have decided to begin our quest this summer taking on four states: Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

After spending some special time with my son, daughter-in-law, and three grandchildren in Canton, Georgia, Rocky and I are going to spend the next eight days exploring some of the beauty of the AT. Today, Sunday 6/17/18, we drove to the approach trail at Amicalola Falls State Park and hiked the 604 steps to the top of the falls. The cascade is truly amazing. We visited the welcome center and got our first stamp in our official AT Passports; we entered the approach trail via the iconic arch at the welcome center; and we enjoyed meeting three section-hikers hoping to make it North Carolina.

Amicalola Falls

Although Amicalola Falls is not part of the official Appalachian Trial, many thru-hikers begin here and hike the 8.5-mile approach trail to Springer Mountain, Georgia. Rocky and I came down the steps faster than we went up, loaded in our 2018 Maserati (disguised as a 1999 Toyota Camry), and headed down the road to Woody Gap just south of Suches, Georgia. The AT crosses GA. Route 60 at Woody Gap (about mile 21 into the AT) that houses a nice little road-side parking lot and picnic area. Rocky and I parked and headed NOBO (northbound) toward the summit of Big Cedar Mountain. It was beautiful. The forest kept the sun at bay and provided a nice, cool hike. We reached Preaching Rock with an incredible view to the east and finally, the summit of Big Cedar Mountain opened up onto a rocky ledge with another amazing view of the mountain range in the distance. Rocky and I enjoyed a relaxing moment on the summit taking in the glory of God’s creation. We met several section hikers on the way back down the mountain. They were all headed for Franklin, North Carolina. We talked with another hiker from Hawaii who is planning to hike as far as she can. She was carrying a pack that looked like it was over 50 pounds while I would guess that she weighed no more than 110 pounds. She was such a sweet lady and we talked for several minutes and wished her well on her journey.

Rocky on Big Cedar Mountian

From Woody Gap, we drove to Dahlonega, GA, and got a hotel for the night. Rocky went to the outdoor pool and I hit the computer to document the adventure on this blog. Tomorrow we head for Neels Gap, Georgia, at the 31.7-mile marker. I will try to post some photos and some words capturing out adventure.

Categories: 14-State Challenge, Amicalola Falls, Appalachian Trail, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Georgia, Hiking, Neels Gap, Rocky, Rowdy, Trail, Woody Gap | Tags: , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Hickory Changes His Plans

Hickory

One of the thru-hikers of the Appalachian Trail that began his adventure on February 27th has decided to alter his plans. Hickory, from Indianapolis, Indiana, was making great mileage and had hiked 724 miles of the AT when he arrived at Daleville, Virginia on April 16th. On this, his 49th day of the hike, Hickory changed gears and opted to abandon his thru-hike attempt, travel to Delaware Water Gap on the Pennsylvania/New Jersey border, and continue a trek from Delaware Water Gap to Gorham, New Hampshire. This section hike will allow him to complete his previously aborted thru-hike in 2013.

Hickory successfully thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail in 2011. He completed the trail a second time in sections during 2009-2010. This section from New Jersey to New Hampshire will allow him to complete three trips from Georgia to Maine.

Woods Hole Hostel -Photo by Hickory

I wish Hickory well as he continues his adventure along the trail. I will not, however, continue to follow his journal as I track the progress of thru-hikers.

Hickory was somewhat of a mystery to me as I read his online diary. He did not provide his real or hometown. He indicated his hometown in a pre-hike post in which he mentioned a local park he visited. He did not take many pictures (only three) on his adventure so it was more difficult to get to know him through the pages of his journal. He seems like a very intelligent individual as he reflected on the daily experiences. I leave you with his final entry as he explains his decision to change the goal of his hike,

Hickory on McAfee Knob

Economists explain diminishing returns as: a point at which the level of benefits gained is less than the amount of money or energy invested. 

It’s not that I have lost interest in this AT journey. I haven’t. Hiking in the wilderness is intrinsically rewarding. I have reached a comfortable level of satiety in which I am no longer compelled to go beyond “the next blaze” until there are no more blazes. Eschewing labels and being a bit of a free spirit, I choose to leapfrog north to resume hiking where my 2013 hike left unfinished business. 

Having thru-hiked (2011) and completed the entire trail in sections (2009-2010), my ambition now is to complete another entire AT journey by trekking to Gorham from DWG. I will be satisfied to have hiked all the AT three times.

Today I “zero” on Amtrak and Martz bus so I can be back on-trail tomorrow. 

Hickory

If you would like to continue a virtual walk with Hickory, please check out his journal at http://www.trailjournals.com/journal/entry/581876. May he find great fulfillment as he continues down the path (HYOH).

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Class of 2018, Delaware Water Gap, Georgia, Hickory, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Thru-Hike | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Winter Hits Hard on the AT

Winter Appalachian Trail in March

I have been following 14thru-hikers of the Appalachian Trail. They are all journaling on trailjournals.com and all 14 of them started either in January or February of 2018. The 2018 trail season so far has been wet and then cold and then snowy. The weather has taken its toll on some of the hikers and has caused some slower pace for many.

Five of the original fourteen are off the trail, at least temporarily. Genesis the earliest hiker, began his journey on January 14th. He hiked from Harpers Ferry, West Virginia to Caledonia State Park close to his home in Pennsylvania. He then came south to Georgia, hiked for six days beginning art Springer Mountain until coming off Blue Mountain, GA, (50 mile-marker) soreness in both knees forced him back to Pennsylvania. After two weeks of rest and recovery, Genesis returned to the trail of Georgia (March 23). Three days and 19.6 miles later, he realized that his knees were not going to support his trek. He returned to Pennsylvania with hopes of trying again in late April.

Zin Master started January 23 and went off-trail with tendinitis on February 27. He and his wife, Peaches, and dog, Moxie have recently traveled to Kingsport, Tennessee, where Zin is doing some day hikes.

Class Act

Class Act was hit hard by the cold temperatures and the overcrowded shelters. He was in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park when he realized that his slow pace was going to make his thru-hike impossible. Having begun his adventure on February 18, he jumped off the trail on March 16 having hiked about 182 miles of the AT, averaging a little more than 6.7 miles per day. He hopes to do some sections hikes I the near future.

Dave Snow and his dog, Abbie, began their thru-hike attempt on February 26th. I am assuming that they are off-trail because he has not entered a post for 16 days. I will continue to check his journal, but for now, I have noted that he is off-trail without comment.

Pigweed

The fifth hiker to recently call a halt to his hike is Pigweed, Lee Richards from Delaware. Pigweed began his AT adventure on February 27th, hiked 165 miles, and ended his hike at Fontana Dam just south of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. He suffered an ankle injury that would not respond to rest. He took four zero days at Wolf Creek Hostel near Stecoah Gap, North Carolina, but after returning to two painful days of hiking, Pigweed decided to head back home and seek doctor’s care.

I will post an update on the remaining nine hikers tomorrow (March 29). A few have not posted for several days but hopefully, they will all check in today.

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Class Act, Class of 2018, Genesis, Georgia, Hiking, Pigweed, Thru-Hike, Trail, Zin Master | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

AT Hikers: March 25th Update

I have been following several earlier starter on the Appalachian Trail. Here is an update on thier progress.

Genesis

Genesis

Rich Miller (Genesis) is a thru-hiker from Pennsylvania that began his hike in Harpers Ferry on January 14th. He hiked from West Virginia back to his home state through February and then headed to Georgia. He trekked in the Peach State for 6 days and then coming off Blue Mountain both his knees started to hurt, so he decided to drive back to PA to recoup (10-hour drive).  He is now back in Atlanta planning his return to the trail.

Zin Master – started January 23 is now OFF TRAIL – leg injury

Hard Knocks

Patrick Knox, tail name Hard Knocks, started on January 31. His journal has been silent since March 22nd when he was camping a Chatfield Shelter about 4 miles south of Atkins, Virginia. On the 22nd he posted,”Tomorrow I will try to make it to a town as it looks like there may be some big rain coming in on Saturday.” I am hoping that his silence means he has been enjoying so dry and warm rest in Atkins.

Hemlock Hollow Inn

Vagabond Jack

Jack Masters, from Kansas City, took his first steps on the famous Appalachian Trail on February 1. Vagabond Jack last post reflected a hostel about 15 miles north of Hot Springs at Allen Gap. He spent four zero-days there avoiding the winter storms and snow at Hemlock Hollow Inn. His last post on March 22nd“I decided to wait one more day before heading back out onto the trail. Besides giving my toe another day of healing, the weather should be a bit better. The sun finally came out today, and the snow is beginning to melt. I’ll be glad to get back out there instead of lazing around the hostel.” I am still waiting for an update from Vagabond. 

Opa

Opa’s Tent 3/25/18

Opa (Reinhard Gsellmeier), the retired engineer from Rochester, NY, began his thru-hike on February 10. Opa continues to hike through the winter weather and on March 25th he was camping at a stealth site 8.7 miles north of Pearisburg, Virginia (around mile-maker 640). He had wisely taken a zero-day in Pearisburg. On the 25th he hikes through a great deal of snow. He reached Rice Field Shelter around 2:30 but decided to push on a couple more miles and stealth camp. His words give insight into the difficulties of the AT in winter and the attitude to continue,  “Let me tell you it was very slow going as at this point I was on the ridgeline and the snow was deep. Staying on trail was also a challenge, and several times I had to rely on the Guthook GPS feature to keep me on trail. I found a good spot to camp, setup camp quickly, made dinner and hung my bear bag. I am now in my sleeping bag for the nite…. will wait for daylight before heading out. Aside from all the snow, it was a pleasant, sunny day today. I hope it continues. I didn’t pound out a lot of miles today, but am OK with that as it was slow going.”

Bamadog’s Igloo

Bamadog

Marty Dockins hit the trail on February 15th. His last post was from a hostel in Roan Mountain, Tennessee. His “sweetie” was meeting him at Roan Mountain and he was planning on a couple of days off trail. Three or four days ago on the trail he had an unwelcomed surprise, “Just made it to my campsite as it started to rain. It poured rain with thunder and lightning. When I woke up I was in an igloo. It had snowed 4 to 6 inches overnight.

Class Act

Class Act

Class Act, a Retired physician, Alan Conlon, took his first steps on the AT on February 18, 2018. Unfortunately, he decided to end his hike on March 14th. He had two days of very difficult hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Both days the temperatures were in the 20s and then at night, they dropped into the single digits. The snowy and slick trails made the elevation challenges even more difficult. His conclusion was that his pace was too slow to complete the journey.

Chip Tillson

Chip began his AT adventure on February 20, 2018. As of March 17, he has trekked over 200 miles and finds himself about half-way through the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. On March 16, he slipped on some mud and took a nasty fall, landing on his left elbow and wrenching his shoulder. He has taken six days off the trail at a friend’s home in Raleigh, NC, and is now making his way back to the trail. His elbow and shoulder are still sore but a doctor’s visit confirmed that there is nothing broken. March 25th was his first day back and he sloshed and slid 3.1 miles from Newfound Gap to Ice Water Shelter (appropriate name shelter for this time of year).

Sour Kraut

Tim Pfeiffer, who started on February 21st.  His photo journal makes it difficult to track his mileage but his last photos show him in Hot Springs around March 22nd.

Which Way hiking out of Newfound Gap 3/25/18

Which Way and Next Step

Darrell (Next Step) and Alicia (Which Way) Brinberry, retired military most recently stationed in Washington, DC, began their adventure on February 24th. They took two zero-days in Gatlinburg and then along with Chip Tillson (they do not mention meeting him), they left Newfound Gap on March 25 and hiked 8.5 miles to Peck Corner Shelter. They are sharing the shelter with at least ten other hikers and several mice scampering on the rafters – all trying to stay warm.

Dave and Abbie

Dave Snow and his dog (trail name Abbie) started the Appalachian Trail on February 26th. Dave’s last post was on March 11 when he and Abbie were taking a zero-day in Franklin. I will continue to check his journal but I think he is OFF TRAIL.

RTK’s Photo 3/18/18

RTK

Return To Katahdin (RTK), Bruce Matson is reporting his adventure in posts summarizing each week. He posts a week behind his current location so his last post reflects his journey through March 19.  He took the 16th  and 17th of March as zero-days in Gatlinburg and then returned to the Great Smoky Mountains Nation Park. He completed the park on the 19th and enjoyed a stay at Standing Bear Hostel just outside of the park.

Pigweed

Pigweed, Lee Richards, started with the approach trail from Amicalola Falls on February 26 and started accumulating AT miles on the 27th. Pigweed took four zero-days at Wolf Creek Hostel in hopes of nursing an injured an Achilles heel. He got back on the trail, hiked 8.5 miles but realized that the heel was not going to respond for the long haul. He has decided to get off the trail for now, head back to Delaware and evaluate a possible return as he rehabs the ankle.

Hickory

Hickory who began on February 26. On March 17th, Hickory has covered 255.9 miles of the Appalachian Trail. On March 24th (his last post) he was camping at Clyde Smith Shelter at mile marker 368. He did take his first zero-day in Erwin, TN on March 22nd. The cold weather is tough on all the thru-hikers. Hickory shared in his last post, “I am in another shelter, another winter storm, another cold night. In every journey moments arise which require “in-flight corrections” and reassessments. Extensive winter hiking was not anticipated for this journey. I will see what challenges Roan presents tomorrow, then plan day-by-day

Here is the latest mileage update for each hiker.

 

Last Post Mile Hiker Location Start Date
3/21/18 50.5 Genesis Atlanta 1/14/18
3/11/18 109.8 Dave and Abbie Franklin – OFF TRAIL 2/26/18
2/27/18 129.2 Zin Master OFF TRAIL 1/23/18
3/23/18 159.2 Pigweed Cable Gap -OFF TRAIL 2/27/18
3/16/18 182.5 Class Act OFF TRAIL 2/18/18
3/2518 209.8 Chip Tillson Ice Water Shelter GSMNP 2/29/18
3/25/18 217.2 Which Way/ Next Step Peck’s Corner Shelter GSMNP 2/24/18
3/19/18 240.8 RKT Standing Bear Farm 2/25/18
3/22/18 273.9 Sour Kraut Hot Springs 2/21/18
3/22/18 288.1 Vagabond Jack Allen Gap 2/1/18
3/24/18 368.1 Hickory Clyde Smith Shelter, TN 2/27/18
3/23/18 391.8 Bamadog Roan Mountain, TN 2/15/18
3/22/18 538.2 Hard Knocks Chatfield Shelter, VA 1/31/18
3/25/18 640.0 Opa North of Pearisburg, VA 2/10/18
Categories: Appalachian Trail, Atlanta, Class of 2018, Gatlinburg, Georgia, GSMNP, Hiking, Hot Springs, North Carolina, Pearisburg, Standing Bear Farm, Tennessee, Thru-Hike, Virginia | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

AT Thru-Hikers: March 11th Update

Here is an update on the 14 thru-hikers of theApplalchain Trail that I am following. All of them started the trail in January or February of 2018.

Genesis

Genesis

Rich Miller from Pennsylvania and his sister began their hike on January 14. They did some hiking in PA for a few weeks (from Harpers Ferry, WV up to Caledonia State Park, PA) logging in about 70 miles on the AT. They made their way to Springer Mountain, Georgia and began their NOBO hike on March 1. Coming off Blue Mountain on a very rainy Tuesday (March 8th) both his knees started to hurt, so they decided to drive back to PA to recoup (10-hour drive).  The plan to continue some more hiking on the AT in PA and then drive back to Unicoi Gap over Easter weekend and hike north once again.

Zin Master

Zin, Ken Nieland, decided to get off the trail on February 27 with tendinitis in his lower right leg. No update on his blog since then. I have not taken him off my official list, but silence is not a good sign.

Hard Knocks

Hard Knocks

Patrick Knox, tail name Hard Knocks, started on January 31. He experienced some AT winter weather on the 7th and 8th of March. On Wednesday (8th) he was greeted with cold temperatures and 6 inches on snow.  “… the trail footing was hard to see.  Needless to say, I fell down a couple of times but, thankfully, there are no injuries to report.” The next day the wind took over with major gusts that literally knocked him over. He stopped at a crossroad and got a shuttle to Doe River Hostel in Roam Mountain area. He was hoping to slackpack out of the hostel, but March 8th was his most current post.

Vagabond’s Shelter in GSMNP

Vagabond Jack

Jack Masters, from Kansas City, took his first steps on the famous Appalachian Trail on February 1, His last updated was on March 7th and he was camping at Newfound Gap with Okie, and Camo hoping to get to Gatlinburg but the road is closed because of the snow.

Opa

Opa’s Trail on March 8

Opa (Reinhard Gsellmeier), the retired engineer from Rochester, NY, began his thru-hike on February 10. He had been hiking as part of the Four Horsemen (including Jeep, Night Train, and Captain Blackbear). The four have now become the three as Jeep elected to stay in Erwin to heal from shin splints. They hit major weather as well as they spent the night at Roam High Knob Shelter (the highest shelter on the AT). ”Accumulations I’m estimating at 5-6”, with drifts up to a foot. Temperatures dropped steadily during the day as well. It was a difficult day, lots of climbing elevation and cold, windy, snowy…. I also had my first two slips and falls of the hike today. Nothing serious, I bounced back. I should put my microspikes on. Oh yeah, I mailed them back home when I was in Hot Springs.  Of the cohort that I am following, Opa has hiked the farthest at 434.5 miles. One interesting fact I learn about Opa this week: he was born in Munich, Germany,  and immigrated with his parents to the US in 1955 when I was three.

Bamadog

Bamadog at Rocky Top

Marty Dockins hit the trail on February 15th. His last post reflected his stay in Hot Springs, the first trail town along the trail, where the AT goes right down the main street of the community (Bridge Street). He hiked through knee-deep snow as well but enjoyed a nero of 3.2 miles from Deer Park Mountain Shelter to Hot Springs for a day of rest.

Class Act

Class Act

Retired physician, Alan Conlon, took his first steps on the AT on February 18, 2018. He has been doing some slack packing (carrying only what is needed for the day and utilizing the shuttle of a hostel to drop him off and/or pick him up after his day’s hike) for several days. Stationed at Wolf Creek Hostel in Stecoah Gap, Class Act has made good progress for the past three days. He met and had dinner with Chip Tillson on Saturday, March 10th. He has his eye on Fontana Dam as his destination for March 12.

Chip

Chip Tillson

Chip has experienced some of the attrition that occurs on the AT. In his journal he shares, “Several people I’ve hiked with have already left the trail. Among them: Georgia and Nick were rained out, Music Man got a bad toothache, Gabriel blew out his knee, Marbles got picked up in Franklin with a possible broken foot, Water Leaf just didn’t like climbing mountains, and today I learned John is headed home with a foot injury.”  A few days later he shared that his feet are bothering him, ”My feet have been sore the past couple of days and around noon I felt a growing pain in one foot.” He is planning two zero days followed by two days of slackpacking before he makes his way into the Smokies.

Sour Kraut Photo near Fontana Dam

Sour Kraut

Tim Pfeiffer, who started on February 21st.  His photo journal makes it difficult to track his mileage but his last photos show him in the Fontana Dam Area ready to enter the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Which Way headed up Albert Mountain

Which Way and Next Step

Darrell (Next Step) and Alicia (Which Way) Brinberry, retired military most recently stationed in Washington, DC, began their adventure on February 24th. I really enjoy reading their journal. They are so optimistic despite some a nagging toe blister and knee problems. They share about trail worship and God’s faithfulness which really pulls me into their adventure. They are staying at the Wayah Bald Shelter on Sunday, March 11.

No New Photos – Abbie

Dave and Abbie

Dave Snow and his dog (trail name Abbie) started the Appalachian Trail on February 26th and Abbie has been enjoying the outdoor environment. Dave seems to express a more pessimistic look at the trail with a little complaining attitude toward the accommodations and the weather. He and Abbie have spent six nights out of fourteen in hotels/hostels, so that are experiencing the inn-environment of the first two states more than some of the other hikers.

RTK

RTKs Tent

Return To Katahdin (RTK), Bruce Matson is reporting his adventure in posts summarizing each week. His last post covered his first week of hiking February 23-27. I now that he reached Dick’s Gap on March 3, but that is the latest update I have on my lawyer friend from Virginia.

Pigweed

Pigweed at Ga/NC border

Pigweed, Lee Richards, started with the approach trail from Amicalola Falls on February 26 and started accumulating AT miles on the 27th. As of March 10th, he was a Rock Gap having passed the 100-mile marker at Albert Mountain. He is beginning to have some physical problems. His journal on March 10th reflected some foot pain, “Unfortunately I strained my Achilles heel about halfway through the prior days 16-mile hike. Ibuprofen and general Slow Go hiking got me over Mount Albert and to the first Gap and Road. I decided to call a shuttle and get out at Rock Gap instead of continuing the next 3.7 miles to our destination with the rest of the Gang. I’ll pick that up when I resume the hike. I had planned to do a zero-day in Franklin anyway on Sunday. We’ll see if one zero-day is enough to heal up.”

Hickory

Hickory – does not post photos

Hickory began the same day as Pigweed but has walked at a much stronger pace. On March 11th, Hickory has covered 179.6 miles of the Appalachian Trail and has entered into the GSMNP (Smokies). He has only taken one nero-day (2 miles) in his first two weeks of hiking. He has thru-hiked the AT in 2011, so he probably knows his pace. I looked at my blog and on day 13 of my thru-hike, I camped at the same shelter, but Hickory is hiking through the winter weather and I was enjoying warmer spring temperatures and sunny skies.

He is the latest update on the hiker’s progress (not some posts are earlier than others).

Up Date Mile Marker Hiker Location Start Date
3/11/18 50.5 Genesis Poplar Stamp Gap 1/14/18
3/2/18 69.2 RTK Dick’s Creek 2/25/18
3/10/18 106 Pigweed Rock Gap 2/27/18
3/11/18 109.8 Dave and Abbie Franklin 2/26/18
3/11/18 120.8 Which Way/ Next Step Wayah Bald Shelter 2/24/18
3/11/18 129.2 Zin Master OFF Trail 1/23/18
3/11/18 150.7 Chip Tillson Stecoah Gap 2/20/18
3/11/18 158.4 Class Act Yellow Creek Road 2/18/18
3/9/18 165.5 Sour Kraut Fontana Dam Area 2/21/18
3/11/18 179.6 Hickory Russel Field (GSMNP) 2/27/18
3/7/18 206.8 Vagabond Jack Newfound Gap 2/1/18
3/11/18 273.9 Bamadog Hot Springs 2/15/18
3/8/18 376 Hard Knocks Roam Mountain Area 1/31/18
3/11/18 434.5 Opa Erwin, TN 2/10/18
Categories: Appalachian Trail, Class of 2018, Fontana Dam, Franklin, North Carolina, Gatlinburg, Georgia, GSMNP, Hiking, Hot Springs, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Roan Mountain, Rocky Top, Slackpack, Tennessee, Thru-Hike | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

AT Hikers: March 5th Update

Here is a quick update on the 14 AT thru-hikers that I am following this season.

Genesis and Sister

Genesis

Rich Miller from Pennsylvania established the earliest 2018 online journal of an attempted thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail (via trailjounrnals.com). He and his sister began their hike on January 14. They did some hiking in PA for a few weeks (from Harpers Ferry, WV up to Caledonia State Park, PA) logging in about 70 miles on the AT. They made their way to Springer Mountain, Georgia and began their NOBO hike on March 1. They have trekked another 45 miles from Springer and are camped at Poplar Stamp Gap.

Zin Master

Zin, Ken Nieland, decided to get off the trail on February 27 with tendinitis in his lower right leg. He is evaluating his future on the trail at his in-laws in Kingsport Tennessee. I have not taken him off my official list, but silence is not a good sign.

Hard Knocks

Hard Knocks

Patrick Knox, tail name Hard Knocks, started on January 31. He has experienced some backpack problems in the last week. His waist belt let loose causing his sternum strap to break. He made some on the trail repairs. He also experienced some muscle pain in his inner thigh running down to his knee. He took a zero-day (on March Saturday, March 3) and gave his body a rest.  The next day, he hiked 24 miles into Erwin, Tennessee, totally 341.5 miles on the AT.

Vagabond Jack

Vagabond Jack

Jack Masters, from Kansas City, took his first steps on the famous Appalachian Trail on February 1. He was in Fontana Dam (mile 165) on March 3rd about to enter the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Cell phone coverage is sometimes non-existent in this area, and he did not post in his journal for several days. He updated on March 6th and is camping in the GSMNP at Derrick Knob Shelter (mile 188.8).

Opa

Uncle Johnny’s Hostel

Opa (Reinhard Gsellmeier), the retired engineer from Rochester, NY, began his thru-hike on February 10. He has been recently hiking as part of the Four Horsemen (including Jeep, Night Train, and Captain Blackbear). They arrived at Ervin, Tennessee on March 5 and I am interested to see if Opa meets Hard Knocks at Uncle Johnny’s hostel. Opa shared in his journal some sad trail news. Uncle Johnny passed away suddenly about two weeks ago. His wife, Charlotte plans to continue running the hostel. I met Uncle Johnny on my hike and he will be missed by the hiking community.

Bamadog

Bamadog

Marty Dockins hit the trail on February 15th. His sweetheart met him at Newfound Gap (mile marker 206. 8) on March 4th and they spent a zero-day in Gatlinburg, TN on March 5. He lost cell phone coverage for 5 days but averaged 11.5 miles through the first part of the GSMPN (Smoky Mountains).

Class Act

Class Act

Retired physician, Alan Conlon, took his first steps on the AT on February 18, 2018. He has been very strategic in this first part of his hike. He has attempted to avoid the brutal weather but taking a few zero days (two at the Top of Georgia Hostel) but had begun to increase his distance per day with three 12-mile hikes before coming to Franklin, North Carolina. He is planning another zero-day in Franklin on the 6th of March.

Chip Tillson

Chip Tillson

Chip has not mentioned Class Act in his journal, but I think the road into Franklin together on a shuttle on Monday. Chip is planning on a zero-day on Tuesday as well so maybe they will connect. Chip began the trail on February 20th and this will be his first zero-day of his hike.  His pace has been conservative (7.8 miles per day) and he has taken two nero (near-zero) days of less than 4 miles. His consistent effort will begin to pay off with some trail legs and longer distances.

Sour Kraut

Sour Kraut

Tim Pfeiffer, who started on February 21st, is keeping more of a photo/video journal that a written daily entry. It is a little difficult to know exactly where he is, but his last photos seem to indicate that he summitted Siler Bald on March 3. He is enjoying hammock camping along the way.

Which Way and Next Step

Which Way and Next Step

Darrell (Next Step) and Alicia (Which Way) Brinberry, retired military most recently stationed in Washington, DC, began their adventure on February 24th. Their journal bursts with a great attitude and excitement about the trail. Which Way has recently developed a blister on the little toe that had caused some major discomfort. Isn’t it amazing how even the smallest of body parts can be so essential to a successful hike? They have persevered and have already logged in over 78 AT miles.

Abbie

Dave and Abbie

Dave Snow and his dog (trail name Abbie) started the Appalachian Trail on February 26th and Abbie was enjoying the outdoor environment. They made it to Dick’s Creek and the Top of Georgia Hostel on March 5th and spent the night in The Wolf Den which is set apart for hikers with dogs. Dave has plans to shuttle to a hotel in Hiawassee on March 6th.

RTK

RTK

Return To Katahdin (RTK), Bruce Matson was a special trail angel for me during my 2014 thru-hike of the AT. I have been following his preparation for the hike and was excited to follow his adventure. He started on February 24 by conquering the approach trail from Amicalola Falls to Springer Mountain plus the one mile of actual AT to the parking lot off USFS 42. I heard nothing from him since that first day and was concerned about his hike. He commented on this blog that he was indeed alive and well and that his posts were coming soon. On March 2 he was safe and sound at Dick’s Creek (about 70 miles along the trail). It is so good to hear that he is stepping out in a strong and consistent trek.

 

Pigweed

Pigweed

Pigweed, Lee Richards, also started with the 8.8-mile approach trail from Amicalola Falls. He began on February 26 and started accumulating AT miles on the 27th. As of March 5th, he has walked 52.9 and arrived at Unicoi Gap. He grabbed a ride into Helen, Georgia a Bavarian-style mountain town, where got a hotel room, enjoyed a long shower, washed his clothes and was looking forward to a great dinner with several other thru-hikers.

Hickory

Hickory

Hickory began the same day as Pigweed but has walked at a much stronger pace. On March 5th, Hickory has covered 87 miles of the Appalachian Trail and is camped at Standing Indian Mountain. He has taken one nero-day (a two-mile hike and stay at the Top of Georgia Hostel) but other than that short day, he has averaged 14.3 miles per day.

Up Date Mile Marker Hiker Location Start Date
3/5/18 44.6 Genesis Poplar Stamp Gap 1/14/18
3/5/18 52.9 Pigweed Unicoi Gap 2/27/18
3/2/18 69.2 RTK Dick’s Creek 2/25/18
3/5/18 69.2 Dave and Abbie Dick’s Creek 2/26/18
3/5/18 78.6 Which Way/ Next Step Bley Gap 2/24/18
3/5/18 87 Hickory Standing Indian Mt 2/27/18
3/5/18 109.8 Chip Tillson Franklin, NC 2/20/18
3/5/18 109.8 Class Act Franklin, NC 2/18/18
3/4/18 114 Sour Kraut Siler Bald 2/21/18
3/5/18 129.2 Zin Master Tellico Gap 1/23/18
3/5/18 188.8 Vagabond Jack Derrick Knob Shelter 2/1/18
3/5/18 206.8 Bamadog Gatlinburg 2/15/18
3/5/18 341.5 Opa Erwin, TN 2/10/18
3/4/18 341.5 Hard Knocks Erwin, TN 1/31/18

 

Categories: Amicalola Falls, Appalachian Trail, Erwin, Georgia, Hiking, Thru-Hike, Uncategorized, Uncle Johnny's Hostel | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

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