Waynesboro

Mid-May Brings Miles on the Appalachian Trail

As a change of pace, I thought I would provide an update on the seven Appalachian Trail thru-hikers with their own words. Since my last post of May 10, each hiker has been making progress. As of their last posts (most of them on May 16th), here is where they are:

Hard Knocks – Port Clinton, PA.: mile 1,214

Bamadog – ten miles north of Boiling Springs, PA.: mile 1,127

Chip Tillson – 25 miles north of Daleville, VA.: mile 750

Sour Kraut – Luray, VA.: mile 938

Which Way and Next Step – VA 56, Tye River: mile 828

RTK – Big Meadows Campground, VA. (Shenandoah National Park) mile 921

Pigweed – Shady Valley, TN.: mile 452

 

Hard Knocks

5/ 10 It was raining on us after a few hours and the rocks got slick and the dirt got muddy.  I lost the end of one of my trekking poles in the mud and it was lost and gone forever.  With this terrain, functional trekking poles are a necessity…stop in Duncannon….so I could buy new poles.  Since we [Hard Knocks, Roam, and Happy Feet] were there and wet, we decided to call it a day.  We checked in at the Doyle Motel.  If passing this way you should know that this is NOT the Hilton!  

5/13 ‘Rocksylvania’ has truly earned its name among hikers.  Lots of different rock challenges here. We have had mazes to go thru, boulders to climb over, and general walking hazards in uneven and unstable steps.

5/16 [After a zero-day in Port Cilton, PA] Just a quick object lesson I guess.  In addition to staying hydrated you must provide plenty of fuel for the fire, and the calorie fire is huge when you are hiking the AT.  So now I am off to burn more calories!  

Shenandoah River, Harpers Ferry, WV

Bamadog

5/10 The roller coaster was rough. I got overheated. It rained and made everything slick. I turned my foot over again. Very painful….Hope to get into Harpers Ferry tomorrow afternoon. Hope everyone is doing well. Thank you for your prayers

5/13 I have a shin splint on my other leg now. Went into Waynesboro and resupplied. Had wonderful people bring me to town and take me back to the trail head. Very much appreciated. 

5/16 Started walking at 7:20. Walked in rain most of the day. It was a beautiful day in the forest. Climbed boulders in the morning and walked in mud and water in the afternoon. Had to set my tent up in a jungle. The trail is 6 inches wide and on both sides it is grown up with who knows what.

Chip Tillson

Keffer Oak

5/10 The day started nice enough through pasture lands and past the Keffer Oak. At 300 years old it’s “the 2nd largest oak tree along the AT”. Apparently there’s a bigger one in NY, I’ll let you know….I have just enough food to get to Daleville, three days away. There is a small store halfway where I’ll pick up some extra calories to be sure.

5/13 Sunday’s weather was hot. I heard some hikers say it had affected their mileage but I had no problem, maybe I’m not moving fast enough to get overheated. The Rhododendrons were blooming and the Mountain Laurels are getting ready. Late in the day I passed through a long tunnel of Honeysuckle bushes, sweet!

Saw my first rattlesnake. The rattle end was two feet into the trail, the rest hidden in leaves. Hmmm…what to do. I spotted it easily but it wasn’t hard to imagine someone else coming along and stepping on it. I tossed a few sticks to move it along but that only prompted it to lift its head and look at me, flicking its tongue…unnerving.

5/16 It rained nearly all day but was warm enough so that I went without rain gear. It’s just water, it’ll wash off. The big millipedes seem to have been replaced by little orange newts, they’re everywhere! I wonder what they’re thinking as I thunder through their world like Godzilla. The trail paralleled the Blue Ridge Parkway and crossed it several times at pullover viewing spots. Unfortunately it was foggy: no views…

SNP Map

Sour Kraut – No words – only pictures

Which Way & Next Step

5/10 [After a Zero-day in Daleville, VA.] It always seems to be a little more difficult to get going the day after a Zero…. Fortunately the first couple of miles were relatively flat. The trail here paralleled I-81, eventually crossing under the busy interstate, another open pasture, and finally we were back in the forest, where we belong.

5/13 Mother’s Day… our hike started at 0645, because Which Way wanted to get to town so that she would be available to talk to our kids when they called. I usually get flowers for Which Way on Mother’s Day…. As we departed camp I told her that all of the flowers on along the hike today were hers to enjoy for Mother’s Day. Of course, the trail did not disappoint.

Mother’s Day Flowers for Which Way

We had a single significant climb today and it came early in the hike…. At the top of the climb we paused for a break and to worship. It is so easy to count our blessings and give thanks out here. The wildlife was out and about this morning. We ran across a bunny hopping up the trail, two chipmunks playing chase, squirrels, birds and butterflies fluttering about, a deer just off the trail and two snakes. Some of the wildlife actually posed long enough for a pic. 

5/16 We started hiking a little before 7AM with the intent of making it 17 miles to VA Route 56 by 3PM. We wanted to be off the trail on Thursday so that we could be in contact with our daughter who was having surgery.,,,, We emerged soaking wet from the forest at the VA 56 parking area at 2:45PM…. trail angels Dave and Jim…drove me to the Enterprise rental car agency located another mile or so away. We knew that at some point in the hike we would have to make a quick sprint to Washington, DC so that I could get a Retiree ID Card and we could pick up our 90-day refill of meds…. After shuttling a couple of hikers to a local AYCE Chinese Buffet, we hit the I-64, headed to DC. …We arrived at my cousin Bill’s place in Old Town Alexandria a little before 10pm. Bill had brownies and ice cream ready when we walked through the door. Death by chocolate—Perfect! 

RTK – last post 5/8

RTK at Big Meadows

5/8 Wally and I broke the day – which we knew was a tall order: over 18 miles – into thirds.  The first was a six mile stretch that included two, 2-mile climbs.  By focused attention to a steady pace, we conquered the first third.  The morning was brilliant weather but clouded up most of midday. The next six miles rolled through woodland without any views or points of interest except we were able to have lunch at Lewis Mountain campground.  After climbing Bearfence Mountain, Wally waited for a ride at a Skyline Drive parking lot and I finished the last 6 miles by myself.  The afternoon changed back to the brilliant sky with a cool breeze – wonderful conditions for the hike.  The late afternoon light seemed to help illuminate the wildflowers.  I made very good time on an excellent trail….tented at Big Meadows campground. 

Pigweed last post 5/12

Pigweed’s AT Barn

5/12 Today started rainy and the rain actually came intermittently most of the day. However, it never actually broke out into a hard rain, just enough to make me put my umbrella up and down several times in the morning in the afternoon. I was kind of dragging in the morning and came to about a 5-mile mark and at a shelter when the rain was threatening so I stopped and cooked a hot meal and made some coffee. A hot meal at lunch time is a rare thing but… the real pick me up. Rest of the day went quite well and I ended up doing 16 miles stopping at Low gap. A thunderstorm was raging to the north of me and threatening me so I put up my tent and let it pass with barely any effect, just enough to wet my tent. It caused a late dinner as I did not start cooking until close to 8 but I need the calories after 16 miles.
Today’s hike had an interesting pastoral section where I walked through some actual pastures that connected to Mountain sections. The barn had a big AT symbol on it so the farmer is obviously a friend of the trail. 

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Bamadog, Boiling Springs, Chip Tillson, Class of 2018, Daleville, Duncannon, Hard Knocks, Harpers Ferry, Keffer Oak, Pennsylvania, Pigweed, Port Clinton, Roller Coaster, RTK, Sour Kraut, Thru-Hike, Virginia, Waynesboro, West Virginia, Which Way and Next Step | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

AT Hikers: April 9th Update

I have been on vacation down in North Carolina and West Virginia over the past 10 days, but the nine Appalachian thru-hikers that I am following have been facing some snowy, cold, rainy, windy days. In order to catch you up on their progress and not write a book, I am going to share about four hikers today and the other five tomorrow. The incredible weather of this stubborn spring has made the trail even more challenging as they attempt their 14-state walk.

Hard Knocks with his Parents 2/27/18 (He does not post many photos)

Hard Knocks

Hard Knocks, Patrick Knox Hard Knocks, started on January 31. He just updated his journal that had been spotty since my last update. He did not make a posting from March 22 until March 29. The best that I can tell, he hunkered down at a hostel to avoid the trail storms. He was back on the trail on 3/29 and commented that the trail seemed like a fast-moving creek due to the rain and melted snow. On April 3rd he began having difficulties with his ankle and ended up coming off the trail for three days. He has a niece in Roanoke who picked him up and offered her home for some recovery time. He got a new pair of shoes and replaced his backpack. On April 8th he was back on the trail, passed McAfee Knob and Tinker Cliffs, and ended his ten-mile hike a Lamberts Meadows Shelter. The next day he trekked fifteen miles to Fulhardt Knob Shelter and mile 729 of the Appalachian Trail. He reports that his ankle and new boots are working well as he eases back into longer hikes.

Vagabond Jack at Damascus, VA

Vagabond Jack

Jack Masters, from Kansas City, took his first steps on the famous Appalachian Trail on February 1. Vagabond Jack is consistently moving north. In the past 16 days, he has only taken on zero-day in Roan, Tennessee. On days that he hikes, he is averaging 10.4 miles per day. On April 9th, he arrived at Damascus, Virginia where he plans to zero on the 10th having hiked 468 miles of the AT. In his blog, he mentions that he has met RTK (Bruce Matson) on March 30 and then again on April 5th. They both know Mighty Blue and have been interviewed on Blue’s podcast so they had an enjoyable conversation sharing their adventures thus far. Vagabond Jack, like the other hikers this spring, faced many cold, rain, snowy, windy days. He mentioned the difficult weather on 11 of the past 18 days. His strategy through these challenging conditions has been to gain cover as much as possible. He has only spent the night in his tent three times; he has sought the warmth of a shelter on seven nights; and he has found the comfort of a motel/hostel on eight occasions. His plan seems to be working for him as he stays warmer and well fed along the way.

 

Opa on April 1

Opa

Opa on McAfee Knob

Opa (Reinhard Gsellmeier), the retired engineer from Rochester, NY, began his thru-hike on February 10. Opa is well over 450 miles ahead of Vagabond Jack and has passed Rockfish Gap near Waynesboro, Virginia, trekked 44 miles into Shenandoah National Park and passed the 900- mile marker on the trail. (There are very few actual markers, but guidebooks provide fairly accurate mileage.) But his walk has not been easy. On April 6th, Opa fell four times. He recounts his adversity in his blog, “I fell four times today, one of them hard. Nothing broken, but I have several aches and pains:  my forehead, right hand, left elbow and left knee all ache pretty good as I lay in my tent tonite. My left knee in particular is pretty sore, cut up and a bit swollen. I must have fallen on a rock pretty hard with the knee, as it put a tear in my rainpants – which have a pretty durable fabric…. The funny thing is, I didn’t fall in any of the steeper sections of trail – it was always on a gradual slope. Go figure!” Opa is still hiking in snow and freezing temperatures with water bottles turning into slushies and temperatures in the 20’s overnight.

 

Bamadog

Lotus (in green) and Bamadog (on the right)

Marty Dockins hit the trail on February 15th. His last post in his online journal was April 3rd. He was camped at the Abington Gap Shelter just 6.5 miles from the Tennessee/Virginia border and 11.3 miles from Damascus. He had put in his first 20-mile day and was looking forward to celebrating his 61st birthday in Damascus on the 4th. Bamadog took a week off the trail from March 24-30 to spend some time with his “sweetie,” avoid the weather and rest his tired body. He shares about the hiatus in his journal, I took 7 days off and went home with my sweetheart. Went to the doctor and got my leg checked out. He said my hip belt was pushing in on a nerve that comes out from the front of my hip going to my leg. I adjusted my pack so I am good to go! The first two days back my leg is feeling much better. I did 16 miles yesterday and 14 today. Just climbed 1700 feet to get to this campsite.” It sounds like his time off the trail was refreshing and just what he needed to continue his adventure. I am anticipating an update very soon from Bamadog.

 

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Backpack, Bamadog, Class of 2018, Damascus, Hard Knocks, McAfee Knob, Opa, Shenandoah National Park, Tennessee, Thru-Hike, Tinker Cliffs, Virginia, Waynesboro | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Beaker Back on the Trail

Beaker and Zak

Beaker and his son, Jack

August 27, 2017

Beaker is back on the trail. During the two-week rest after his climb up Mount Katahdin in Maine, he has been busy doing some remodeling his new home in Knoxville, Tennessee; he was able to catch the eclipse with just an hour’s drive to the path of totality – a spectacular event; he had two job interviews for full-time paramedic positions resulting in one offer and the other with high promise; and he finished off his rest-time with a wedding in Columbus, Ohio. He flew out of Columbus and met his son, Zack, in Charlottesville, Virginia. They had dinner together and then Zack dropped his dad off at Rockfish Gap to continue his thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail.

Beaker had walked less than a mile when he felt a pop and felt his backpack fall limp on his shoulders. He quickly stopped and examined the damage. The left shoulder strap had worn through about an inch above where it attaches to the body of the pack. With no way to fix it on the trail, his best option was to call Zack for an emergency pick up.

They drove to Waynesboro, Virginia, and Beaker found a spot at Stanimal’s Hostel. Adam Stanley, Stanimal, is a 2004 thru-hiker of the AT and completed a 2010 hike of the PTC (Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to Canada). Beaker ended up being the only hiker in his hostel for the night. Stanimal promised Beaker a shuttle ride to a tailor in the morning for a pack strap repair or to an outfitter to get the pack replaced.  

This is a fairly inauspicious beginning to this last segment of my hike; however, at least the strap did not break when I was two days’ hike from a town. Hopefully, I can get it repaired and be on my way late morning tomorrow.

I had a similar problem on my thru-hike of the AT in 2014. I sensed a unevenness in my backpack one day and upon closer inspection, notice that my strap was pulling away from the bag. I was able to order and replace my backpack before permanent damage left me having to carry the pack in my arms for miles. Reading of  Beaker’s experience was a reminded of God’s faithfulness to me during my adventure in what could have been a very difficult situation.

It is good to see the chemist from West Virginia (now the paramedic from Knoxville) back on the trail with only a section of 318 miles in Virginia to complete his 2017 thru-hike of the AT.. More to come.

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Beaker, Maine, Mount Katahdin, Thru-Hike, Uncategorized, Virginia, Waynesboro | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Grateful 2 Ends Journey

Grateful 2 is off the trail. I knew he was in emotional trouble as I read his journal.

June 7

Why do people hike the Appalachian Trail? People give a lot of different answers to that question. Some say they are running from something in their everyday life. Maybe so. Some say they are out here for the beauty. If so, then it would be easier to find it in their own town or see it here from a car. You can drive to most of the best spots on the AT. Some say they are out here for the solitude. There’s entirely too many people on the trail for that to be legitimate. Some say they are out here to accomplish something unique or special. Tens of thousands of hikers have already finished the trail, so finishing will not be unique. Some say they are out here for the fun. What’s fun about walking all day in the cold and rain, walking on infected blisters, or climbing for miles when there is no water?

I think most people hike the AT for the challenge of overcoming adversity. It’s hard to get out of your sleeping bag when it’s 20 degrees or pouring rain. It’s hard to climb another mountain when your legs are cramping. It’s hard to carry your pack when you are coming out of town with a full food resupply and your pack is at its heaviest. It’s hard when you get hurt but you decide to keep on walking. Why do you do it? 

There is something In the human spirit that is satisfied when you conquer an obstacle that is difficult to overcome…..

His thoughts were going dark. If you see the trail as only adversity and something to conquer, I think your chances of finishing greatly diminish. Is there adversity? Absolutely – but there is great adventure in the midst of that adversity. There is such beauty that eclipses the discomfort of the climbs. Running from something is not as powerful as running toward something – the freedom, the peace, the spiritual vitality provided by the quiet of the trail. I found great solitude on the trail hiking for hours without seeing anyone. There is a sense of calling, an inner joy, and an urgency to continue to the end that seems absent in Grateful 2’s journal entry.

Sandals at KFC feast

June 10 I was nauseous most of the night. Got up, ate breakfast, and went back to the trail where we walked 16 miles to Waynesboro. Had absolutely no energy today…. We decided to take a zero. Went to church and then to a hotel where I slept all afternoon. Still not feeling well. I did manage to visit the KFC buffet. They lost money on me.

Nauseous and not feeling well and yet packed it away at KFC. I feared that the mental was impacting the physical at this point.

June 12 The radio said tonight it was 94° today, And I’m a believer. Every stitch of clothing was soaking wet all day. The bugs were buzzing everywhere. They were up my nose, in my ears, and three committed suicide flying into my eyes. I swallowed two…. I managed 17 miles today but the miles came with great difficulty because I still don’t feel well. They were no good views today from the trail, only from the roadway. I’m not really enjoying the green tunnel of the Shanendoah national park.

The Shenandoah National Park was one of the easiest stretches of the hike for me. Fairly easy terrain, good food available, good water supply. I knew Grateful 2 was fading fast.

June 13 I carried Sandals to the trailhead and took a zero today. I slept most of the day and then did some trail magic. I’m thinking about going home… I’d think I’d rather be home with my family. We love each other and I miss them. I like living in Chattanooga in our new home. I miss riding my motorcycle and fishing in a bass boat. I like being able to hike the Cumberland Trail in our backyard, and then being able to take a shower before I go to bed in our king-sized bed.

With the decision made, Grateful 2 continued to help Sandals slackpack through the Shenandoahs until Monday, the 19th. He set up some trail magic each day to encourage other hikers along the way. He hiked 900 miles in three months. What a great journey! The memories and the lessons he will take home with him will remain for a lifetime. Katahdin was not attained, but the journey was the reward. My applause goes out to this determined, creative hiker who hiked his own hike and experienced some amazing adventures.

Categories: Adversity, Appalachian Trail, Grateful 2, Shenandoah National Park, Thru-Hike, Trail Magic, Waynesboro | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Grateful 2 – The Key Swapper

Grateful 2’s approach to the thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail is a partner system. They share a truck (sleeper for the night), one drops the other at the trailhead, then drives north to the final destination. The partners hike in opposite directions and pass the truck keys off when they meet along the path. The northbound partner then reaches the truck, drives back to the original trail head and picks up the southbound hiker. He and hiking buddy, Persistent, started this “key swap hike” on April 24 at Erwin, Tennessee. The hike went well for six days with the duo averaging almost 13 miles per day. Then on April 30, Grateful 2 had a bad fall, tripping over a root and finding himself experiencing a face plant that broke his nose and lacerated his forehead.

Grateful 2 was off the trail for seven days healing from his fall. Persistent needed to hike on, so Grateful 2 needed to find a new partner. He drove to Damascus, Virginia, and connected with Chip, a thru-hiker that was needing to rehab a foot. They hiked together for 11 days until the truck developed mechanical problems near Pearisburg, Virginia on May 18th. Chip needed to leave for a conference on May 20th so they needed to say goodbye.

It took several days to repair his vehicle but Grateful 2’s journal entry on May 21 indicated that the “key swap” will continue on the 22nd with another new partner, Peter Pan. In addition to transmission problems the truck needed a repair to the hydraulic lifter delaying the fix until May 26. Peter Pan could not wait for the repairs but Grateful 2 connected with some old trail friends, Bushy and Sparks that agreed to partner in his “key swap” approach.

Dragons Tooth

They hiked 22 miles out of Pearisburg on the first day. The threesome were joined by Grateful 2’s wife and son, Carol and AJ, who planned to help with the slackpacking strategy for a couple of weeks. The hikers were able to see Dragon’s Tooth, an aptly named single massive stone of Tuscarora quartzite. It stands out on its own at the top of Cove Mountain. Bushy and Sparks decided to slow their pace and hike a more traditional hike, so Grateful 2 and his wife and son continued on while looking for yet another partner.

Me on McAfee

During the next three days, the three family members hiked past McAfee Knob, one of the most photographed spots along the AT, along Tinker Cliffs and into Daleville, Virginia for a rest day. The next day (June 2) they met Goalie and Ten, the next partners in the “key swap” adventure. They partnered for seven days, hiking under the Guillotine Rock (which looks a bit like the rolling rock in the first Indiana Jones movie), along the James River, past the 800 mile mark, over Cold Mountain, and to the Tye River – a distance of 100 miles. Goalie and Ten then decided to aquablaze (canoe) down the Shenandoah River, leaving Grateful 2 looking for yet another key swapper.

Guillotine Rock

On June 9th, the day his wife and son returned home to Chattanooga. Tennessee, Grateful 2 connected with a young hiker, Sandals, in Waynesboro, Virginia. Sandals could only commit to a nine-day partnership until he had to leave the trail for a church mission trip, but they started out together through the Shenandoah National Park.

This “key swap” idea has some positive aspects to it – less pack weight to carry every day, a nice, dry place to sleep every night, and easy access to food and town whenever desired – but the down side so far for Grateful 2 are the mechanical difficulties of his truck and needing five hiking partners in 47 days. How hard will it be to continue this process? Only time will tell.

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Daleville, Damascus, Dragons Tooth, Grateful 2, Guillotine Rock, McAfee Knob, Pearisburg, Shenandoah National Park, Thru-Hike, Waynesboro | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fat Hen and Rooster Talon Hike Over 1000 Miles

1000 Mile Marker

1000 Mile Marker

After a couple of weeks of silence, Fat Hen and Rooster Talon have posted to their journal. On June 21, they posted with the excitement of reaching the 1000 mile marker. It is only a small sign nailed to a tree but it is such a motivating sight when you are on the trail. To walk 1000 miles is quite an accomplishment and something to celebrate. This young couple have been on the trail for 95 days and are staying at the Blackburn AT Center about a dozen miles south of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, and the Appalachian Trail Conservancy Headquarters. In Harpers Ferry each of them will get his/her picture taken and receive a thru-hiker number, putting Dan and Becky into the annals of trail history.

Fat Hen GlasgowTheir June 3rd post was from Daleville, Virginia. Several days of hiking and 56 miles later, they arrived at Glasgow, Virginia, a town about 5.9 miles off trail. Catching a ride into town brought back three-year-old memories of a visit the couple made to the town while driving through the area. They remembered the fiberglass dinosaur that graces one of the town’s major intersections and the incredible fried chicken the purchased from the Natural Bridge Country Store. The also remembered giving a thru-hiker a ride into town – what a change of roles this time around. On this return visit, they took a photo with Dino and purchased a 16 piece bucket of chicken, a 2 liter of Dr. Pepper and a half gallon of ice cream from the country store. They enjoyed their stay in Glasgow at a town shelter with electricity and a hot shower.

After leaving the town with the dinosaur, they made their way north past Waynesboro, Virginia and into the Shenandoah National Park. Their hike through the SNP was filled with a menagerie of wildlife and lots of good food. During a four-day period in the park, Dan and Becky saw 12 bears, 2 rattlesnakes and 1 copperhead. They did not share the details of these animal encounters but I can image that they have some exciting stories to tell. They also enjoyed the Waysides along the trail – these are great car-stops along the Skyline Drive that are easy walking from the AT. Th389ey serve some great ice cream as well as some good food. Fat Hen and Rooster Talon specifically commented on the blackberry milkshakes!

After their journey through the national park and a quick stay in Front Royal, Virginia, they hiked through the brutal Roller Coaster (13.5 miles of tightly packed ascents and descents) that will test the calves and shins of any hiker. They safely arrived at Blackburn AT Center and now have their sights on Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. Stay tuned for a picture in front of the ACT Headquarters. My hiker number was 924 when I arrived on June 30, 2014 – I am curious to see how their numbers compare.

Photos or Dan and Becky: http://www.trailjournals.com/photos.cfm?trailname=20168

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Fat Hen, Glasgow, Harpers Ferry, Roller Coaster, Rooster Talon, Shenandoah National Park, Thru-Hike, Virginia, Waynesboro, West Virginia | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fat Hen and Dulcigal – Did They Meet?

Dulcigal

Dulcigal

This hiking season, I am following the thru-hike attempts of several individuals including Dulcigal and a young couple, Fat Hen & Rooster Talon. These three hikers do not know each other but all three arrived at Daleville on June 3. I was wondering if they might meet and share about each other in their journals – I thought that would be so interesting. Unfortunately, I don’t think that occurred.

It is still difficult to be sure because Fat Hen and Rooster Talon have been silent for the past 15 days. Their last post was from Daleville. They are not very diligent in updating their blog. It was 19 days (between Damascus and Daleville – 180 miles) between posts last time, so I am not sure when or where they will surface again but I am pretty sure they are still on the trail. Dulcigal did not mention meeting them in her journal.

James River Bridge

James River Bridge

Dulcigal usually posts about once per week. She left Daleville, VA, and hiked to Glasgow, VA in four days (about 57 miles). She crossed the James River and a trail angel gave her a ride into Glasgow. She found a great shelter built by the Boy Scouts with a shower, microwave, and electricity to charge her cell phone. This four day hike was filled with a good share of rain making the ups & downs glisten with slippery surfaces.  Dulci is feeling good and her feet/knees are responding well to the constant strains of the trail. She is finding the quiet times of the path quite refreshing.

Dulcigal’s June 7th post mentions the thinning out of the trail, referring to the decrease in the number of thru-hikers she is seeing on a daily basis. She might be between “bubbles” or the attrition rate is beginning to take effect. Hikers tend to hike in “bubbles” – groups of hikers walking at about the same pace that move together as a loosely formed group up the trail. There may be a bubble of 15-20 hikers staying in a shelter one night and then the next night there may be no one. I personally tried to avoid the bubbles but often it is hard to do so, when you find a group that hikes your pace and has similar goals for each day.

Dulci.Buffet

Chinese Buffet, Waynesboro

Dulci just posted again on June 13. She is in Waynesboro, VA, just south of the Shenandoah National Park. She is about 161 miles away from Harpers Ferry, the emotional half-way point of the AT. She has stopped in Waynesboro for the Chinese Buffet (AYCE), having gotten a ride (3.7 miles) into town from a trail angel. Rockfish Gap is known for its ministry to hikers by providing free rides into Waynesboro and back to the trail. I ate at that same Chinese Buffet and gluttony ruled the day. I sure hope she enjoyed her meal as much as I did mine.

June 13th was Dulci’s 93rd day on the trail. She seems in such good spirits. Dulci seems very resilient with a deep inner strength. My hope is that she can continue to hike and strategize a way to complete the trail. She has not shared in her journal, but I am wondering if she is planning a flip/flop in order to avoid a late-October arrival at Katahdin. A flip/flop would involve leaving the trail at some point, traveling to Maine, climbing Katahdin while the weather is still agreeable, then hiking south bound back to the jump-off point. Time will tell as the days continue to reveal her adventure.

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Dulcigal, Fat Hen, Glasgow, James River, Rooster Talon, Shenandoah National Park, Uncategorized, Waynesboro | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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