Hiking

April on the AT – Thru-hikers Trek On

AT on April 15, 2018

April 2018 was a cold month with some snow, ice, and slippery trails for those attempting a thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail. It has only been in the last week of April that the temperatures have been comfortable and the conditions reflect the change of seasons. The last week of April find my nine hikers (those brave souls that I have been following on trailjournals.com) spread out over almost 1000 miles of the trail. All of them began their journeys between January 31 and February 27 and all of them have been diligent in their goal of conquering this iconic long-trail covering 2,190 miles through 14 states from Georgia to Maine.

Let me give you a quick update on each hiker in order of their start dates.

The Clan at Stonybrook Organic Farm and Hostel

Hard Knocks, Patrick Knox, started on January 31. As of his last post (4/30/2018) he has been hiking for 90 days and has covered 1,010 miles. He is camped at Stonybrook Organic Farm and Hostel, a religious commune run by the Twelve Tribes Network. Hard Knox shares, “…it is a religiously based commune.  It is a beautiful place and all of the people seem very nice all for the low price of Zero Dollars.  All they ask is that you work a little (I mopped a floor tonight) or consider a donation before you leave.  It is certainly nice enough for me to consider a zero-day tomorrow before I make the hike to Harpers Ferry.  If so, I will give more of a report on the hostel/commune.  So, maybe arrest day tomorrow before I continue walking.” Hard Knocks is averaging 11.2 miles per day and at this rate, it will take him 196 days to complete the trail.

Vagabond Jack, Jack Masters, began his hike on February 1st. His last post was made on April 28th and Vagabond was about 40 trail-miles north of Pearisburg, Virginia, at Laurel Creek Shelter and 670 miles from Springer Mountain Georgia. Jack is only averaging 7.7 miles per day, although he walked 16.5 miles on April 27th and 14.6 miles on April 28th. At the overall rate of 7.7 miles per day, it will take Vagabond Jack 285 day to complete the Appalachian Trail.

Opa in hospital

Opa is Reinhard Gsellmeier from Rochester, NY. He began his thru-hike on February 10th but has covered more miles than any hiker in this group. On April 27th he was at the 1,275-mile mark and experiencing the rocks of Pennsylvania. He met family in Wind Gap, PA, and drove home to Rochester for a few days of relaxing. After a day of resupply, Opa took ill and found himself in a New York hospital.He shared on April 30th, I basically have an enlarged prostate, a condition that is not uncommon for men my age.  I will also be scheduled to see an urologist, who will further evaluate my condition and advise as to treatment options.  My doctor also re-examined my hernia, which I’ve had since last fall, and he advised that my hernia now needs to be surgically repaired once my prostate issue is resolved and before I have any notion of continuing on with my AT hike…. These health issues are nothing serious that can’t be dealt with, but it looks like the continuance of my AT thru hike attempt is going to be put on hold for awhile…  In one respect I consider myself very fortunate that the issue with my prostate manifested itself while I happened to be in Rochester for the weekend….This will be my last journal entry for at least awhile.” I will keep you posted on Opa when he updates his journal.

Bamadog on Tinker Cliffs

Bamadog, Marty Dockins, took his first step on the AT on February 15th. He is averaging 11.1 miles per day and at this current rate, his trip to Mount Katahdin will take 197 days. He has just crossed over the suspension bridge at Tye River, climbed about 3000 feet to Three Ridges Mountain, and is about 25 trail-miles from Waynesboro, Virginia.

Chip Tillson started his hike on February 20, seventy days before his last post on April 30. He is camped close to Walker Gap about half way between Atkins and Bland, Virginia. He is only averaging 8.1 miles per day with an estimated total of 271 days needed to complete his thru-hike. Hopefully, the spring weather will enable him to increase his daily mileage.

The Guillotine

Tim Pfeiffer, Sour Kraut, took to the trail on February 21. He has not posted a written journal entry since March 11, but he submits photos to mark his progress. He posted a picture on April 30 (day 69 of his trek) of The Guillotine, a round rock balanced on rock-outcropping, under which the path leads the hiker. It reminds me of the Indiana Jones movie where Indy has to run away from the rock rolling over his head. The Guillotine is 765 miles into the hike. Sour Kraut is averaging 11.4 miles and at this rate will need 197 days to fulfill the dream.

600 miles for Which Way and Next Step

Which Way and Next Step, the couple from Washington, DC, crossed the 600-mile marker after spending 65 days on the trail. The couple is about two or three days away from Pearisburg, Virginia. They left on February 25 and, so far, are averaging 9.2 miles per day. At this pace, their thru-hike will take 238 days. However, they are making much better mileage in recent days and the weather should help their pace as well.

RTK, Bruce Matson, records his journal a week late so it is difficult to compare his trek with the others. However, on day 58 of his hike (April 23), which began on February 25, he is about 663 miles into his northbound (NOBO) adventure. His pace is 11.4 miles per day with an estimated trip of 192 days.

Spring makes such a difference!

Pigweed started his hike on February 27, had to take two weeks off for an injury, and is now back on the trail. He is several hundred miles behind the others who started in February and is only averaging 5.5 miles per day. He is in Erwin, Tennessee and has hiked about 341 miles. This rate will make his trek last more than a year (398 days). During the past six days, he has increased his mileage to 11.5 miles per day. I think to be successful he will need to continue to increase his daily distance if he hopes to complete this challenge.

My hopes and prayers for these thru-hikers is that the good weather ahead will encourage and refresh them. Their legs should be strong and now, more than ever, the emotional aspects of the trail are critical. Injury is only a fall away, sickness can strike any day, and discouragement can creep up on a hiker without too much warning. But, the warmth and color of spring can propel the hiker with zeal and excitement. May the winds of May fill their lungs, hearts, and minds with strength and a renewed commitment to the journey.

Photo of Commune from https://www.twelvetribes.com/community/stoneybrook-farm-dc-area. All other photos taken from trailjournals.com.

 

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Bamadog, Chip Tillson, Class of 2018, Erwin, Guillotine Rock, Hard Knocks, Hiking, Hostel, Opa, Pearisburg, Pennsylvania, Pigweed, RTK, Sour Kraut, Thru-Hike, Tinker Cliffs, Vagabond Jack, Virginia, Which Way and Next Step | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Every Trail Challenge Complete!!

Rocky and I completed our last hike at Germantown Metropark and completed the Five River MetroPark thru-hike challenge. We had to hike the Orange Trail (7.5 miles) to conquer Germantown and to complete all the trails in the 19 MetroParks in the Dayton area (about 116 miles). We talked a lot about completing the challenge and how good it has been for us to have a walking goal.

Today’s hike (March 25th) was set in a beautiful context of bright blue, cloudless skies, cool temperatures that demanded gloves and a hat, and positive path conditions with very little mud. Rocky and I were a little tired from our 5.3-mile hike yesterday, but once the legs got stretched and body got warmed up we managed the distance just fine.

The Orange Trail makes a circuit around the MetroPark following Twin Creek from the Germantown Dam to Manning Road and back. Rocky and I jumped on the trail just southeast of the dam and enjoyed our strenuous hike through the Old Forest to the Welcome Center. We saw one of our librarian friends from the Miami Township Library, Theresa, on the trail. She is an avid hiker and was out hiking/running the hills.

GO Sign

The Orange Trail intersects with every other trail in the park as it makes its loop. The trail is marked with posts with color circles. As I was making a turn on the Orange Trail where it made a junction with the Green Trail I saw a post I needed to photograph. It is the perfect trail sign. The Green Trail marked with a Green G and the Orange Trail marked with an Orange O looked like the GO trail. I got a chuckle out of that.

The trail descends close to the creek several times during its route and there is great evidence of high water and flooding in the valley. Rocky and I were amazed at the debris and mud-covered tree trunks up to my shoulders. We wondered how traumatic and dramatic the creek must rage during those time of flash floods.

We ended our hike by coming across the spillway and through the woods to the parking lot. We took one another’s picture at the trail-head and celebrated our thru-hike. I told her we should go out and order a pizza (one for each of us) and eat a half gallon of ice-cream, but then I remembered that this was not the Appalachian Trail. Instead, we got in our car, came home and I ate a power-bar.

We filled out our trail logs and Rocky email them to the MetroPark coordinator. Hopefully, we will get our thru-hiker patch soon and celebrate once again.

So now what? Rocky and I are pretty excited about another challenge called the Fourteen-State Challenge sponsored by the Appalachian Trail Conservancy. The challenge is to hike a portion of the AT in each of the 14 states it traverses. (Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine). There is a passport that you can take to various spots to get stamped and of course, there is a patch upon completion. This sound like it has our names written all over it. I’ll keep you posted.

Categories: Germantown MetroPark, Hiking, Local Hikes, Ohio, Rocky, Rowdy, Thru-Hike | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Germantown MetroPark – Day Two

Twin Creek at Germantown

Rocky and Rowdy are down to their last MetroPark – Germantown. We love this park and have spent many hours traversing the trails here, but we are systematically hiking all of the trails in all 19 MetroParks in the Dayton area. We have spent a little time here on March 16th hiking the Pink and Silver Trails. We are back (Saturday, March 24) to hike the trail loops close to the Welcome Center. There are five trail-heads (all loops) that start at the center for a total of 5.3 miles (Red, White, Blue, Green, and Yellow). The elevation change makes these 5.3 miles plenty to hike on a Saturday morning.

We started with the longest one (our typical approach) – the Yellow trail is 1.9 miles. Then we hiked Blue which is 1.0 mile and thirdly, White which is just 0.5 mile. We then crossed a boardwalk by the Welcome Center to hike Green (1.4 miles) and Red (another short half mile trail). The yellow trail leads down to Twin Creek. We noticed the roots of the trees along the bank eroding away and wondered how they were still standing. Some roots go deep and hold on in the midst of adversity. We all need some of those.

The trail was in great shape – there were a few muddy spots, but, by and large, the path was enjoyable and safely navigated. Rocky and I thoroughly enjoyed breathing in the cool outside air and hearing the sounds and sights of early spring. The birds seemed to agree with us as we saw and heard many varieties lifting their voices in song.

Great Old Tree at Germantown

The Yellow Trail take backpackers to the Oak Ridge Backcounty Campsite. Rocky and I did not stop by the camping area, but I have camped here during my preparation for hiking the Appalachian Trail. There is a pond at the center of three campsites and the night I stayed there must have been the weekend of the frog convention because the bullfrogs were croaking from dusk to dawn. A great and memorable story that I don’t desire to relive, but I think about it everytime I pass the turnoff to the campsites.

Rocky found some trash along the trail and in the spirit of Leave No Trace, she picked it up and carried it back to the Welcome Center. It was open and the woman in charge invited us in. It is still under renovation but it should be nice when completed. A few bird-watchers were inside where there is a perfect observation room with large glass panels. They were counting and documenting all the birds they could see as part of an ornithology project. It was fun to listen to them share their expertise. I wish I knew more about bird identification by sight and sound.

Another view by the creek

We saw a few hikers on the trail today but for the most part, we were by ourselves, which is the way I like it. We can talk and pray and enjoy being together. One more day at Germantown and we will have completed our challenge. The MetroParks provide a patch for documented thru-hikers – isn’t it amazing what we will do for a patch!

They say that hiking outside in the fresh air helps to increase your positive endorphins, to strengthen your heart, to increase energy levels, to lower blood pressure, to improve muscle tone, to reduce body fat, to reduce stress, to ward off anxiety and to improve sleep. I am not sure about all that, but we sure do enjoy it. Consider scheduling a hike – the weather is about to warm up. If you live in the Dayton area, I’d urge you to check out the metropark system. If not, maybe there is a wonderful trail nearby.

Categories: Germantown MetroPark, Hiking, Local Hikes, MetroPark, Ohio, Rocky, Rowdy, Thru-Hike | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rocky and Rowdy Conquering the MetroParks

Wegerzyn MetroPark

On our quest to hike all the trails on the 19 Metroparks in the Dayton Area, Rocky and I set out on a super Friday in March (16th) to complete the two “W”s – Wegerzyn Gardens MetroPark and Wesleyan MetroPark. Wegerzyn is about 30 minutes from our home and then another 10-minute drive would connect us to Wesleyan. Both parks had short unmarked hiking trails, but we were not sure how long they were.

Rocky at Wegerzyn

Arriving at Wegerzyn was a blast from the past as Rocky and I lived in this area of the city before moving to Springboro about 12 years ago. The park is beautiful and, as the name implies, it is a series of gardens: there is a children’s garden, an arbor garden, a federal garden, an English garden, a Victoria garden and a woodland garden. Because of the time of year (March 16) and the extended cold weather, the beauty of the gardens had not yet turned majestic, but we promised ourselves a return visit (with our twin granddaughters) in a few months. Our hike was the Marie Aull trail, a loop around the eastern boundary of the park. It was beautiful and I took more pictures here than most trails because of the striking surroundings. The loop was quite short (maybe a mile or so) and the park was so peaceful and quiet.

Wolf Creek at Wesleyan

Our car was patiently waiting for us when we returned, so we hopped in the vehicle and made our way to Wesleyan. Rocky and I had hiked here last year and got twisted around trying to find the trails. We were a little concerned about the navigation of this park. We parked on Wesleyan Road and found the pavilion on the east side of the area. We carefully followed the map down to the Wesleyan Annex and easily found the trail. It was another short trail that led up through the woods and opened on top of a small hill overlooking Wolf Creek. We walked down to the creek and enjoyed looking for birds around the water.

From this trailhead at Wesleyan, we followed a paved pathway across the creek to Adventure Central, a community youth center introducing neighborhood children and youth to afterschool programs, summer day camps, and an annual overnight camp experience. We did not check to see if the center was open but we found the loop trail behind it. It was a very short trail and we were done before we knew it.

Favorite Tree at Sunfish Pond

When Rocky and I got back to the car, it was still mid-morning, so we decided to travel out to Germantown MetroPark and begin hiking our last MetroPark in our challenge. We knew that we would need multiple days at Germantown because it is a trial with some excellent hills and includes about 17 miles of trail. Quickly looking at the map, we thought that if we could knock out the Pink Loop (2.6 miles) and then drive to the Silver Loop (1.6 miles) that would only leave 12.8 miles – very manageable in two more days.

We made our way to the parking lot off Conservancy Road and quickly picked up the Pink Trail. We hiked the trail in the counterclockwise direction and walked past Sunfish Pond, then down the hill where the trail gives you a quick view of Twin Creek. The trail can be very muddy in this area, but it was passable today with just a little slip and slide and mud caked to the bottom of our shoes. The terrain was quick a contrast to our morning, but we loved it. Germantown is our favorite MetroPark. After making the circuit, we drove across the dam to another parking lot and completed the Silver Loop. It shares over half of its mileage with the Orange Trail and contains some thigh-screaming inclines. I am amazed at how well Rocky climbs the hills – even at the end of several hours of hiking. The second part of the Silver Trail is easier as it crosses a nice meadow complete with a bird blind. We were tired by the time we reached our car, but well pleased with the day’s adventure. We enjoyed the songs of the birds and the percussion concert performed by the woodpeckers. We are looking forward to returning to Germantown and finishing our Every Trail MetroPark Challenge.

Categories: Germantown MetroPark, Hiking, Local Hikes, MetroPark, Rocky, Rowdy, Thru-Hike | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Taylorsville: Day Two

The Buckeye Loop

Our Sunday evening church service on March 11th was canceled, so Rocky and I decided to return to Taylorsville MetroPark for an afternoon hike in hopes of finishing all the trails at the park. The day before we had walked the 6.8 miles of blazed trails and today we were headed toward the estimated 7 miles of unmarked trails including the Buckeye Trail Loop, the Bridgewater Loop, The Blue Heron Loop, and the Observation Deck Loop. I like the idea of a loop trail. They sound easy and, in theory, should just take the hiker in a nice, simple circle. However, because of our experience the day before on marked trails that were supposed to be loops but were hard to find, I was a little apprehensive about finding our way on unmarked trails.

Contrary to my misgivings, the trails on Day Two were easy to navigate and the loops were simple to follow. I think my favorite trail of the day was the Buckeye Trail Loop. It began with a long straight tunnel of trees that made the corridor a rather unusual experience. I want to return in the late spring/early summer when the leaves will provide a lush umbrella over the path. The loop turned south and led us along the Great Miami River for a lovely walk beside the water. The loop was about 2.5 miles and was quite flat and easy. I would recommend this trail to anyone wanting a nice easy stroll in the woods.

Rocky in the Gnarly Wood

We drove across the Taylorsville Dam to the east side and turned right down Bridgewater Road to the Bridgewater Loop. The entrances were closed so we parked our car along the road and hiked to the trailhead. This loop took us as well along the river on the opposite bank and further south from the Buckeye loop. It was a shorter trail than the Buckeye loop and it had a little elevation change but not much – another easy trail.

Observation Deck Loop

Rocky and I hopped back into our Toyota and drove to a third area that had easy access to both the Blue Heron Loop and the Observation Deck Loop. We walked the Blue Heron Loop first and were greatly disappointed when we did not see one Blue Heron. The path circled an inland lake with ducks and geese but no heron was there posing for my camera. On the opposite side of the parking lot was the Observation Deck Loop. This trail basically encircled a large field. We thought it is was a rather boring trail until we saw two gorgeous bluebirds. Neither Rocky nor I had not seen bluebirds in years and it was a highlight of the day. It was a perfect way to end our time at Taylorsville MetroPark

It is always enjoyable to be with my wife on the trails and today was no exception. The weather was beautiful, the trail was relatively dry, and the conversation/prayer time was sweet. Three more MetroParks to go to complete our thru-hike challenge. Next up: Wesleyan and Wegerzyn.

Categories: Buckeye Trail, Hiking, Local Hikes, Rocky, Rowdy, Taylorsville MetroPark, Thru-Hike | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Winter Hits Hard on the AT

Winter Appalachian Trail in March

I have been following 14thru-hikers of the Appalachian Trail. They are all journaling on trailjournals.com and all 14 of them started either in January or February of 2018. The 2018 trail season so far has been wet and then cold and then snowy. The weather has taken its toll on some of the hikers and has caused some slower pace for many.

Five of the original fourteen are off the trail, at least temporarily. Genesis the earliest hiker, began his journey on January 14th. He hiked from Harpers Ferry, West Virginia to Caledonia State Park close to his home in Pennsylvania. He then came south to Georgia, hiked for six days beginning art Springer Mountain until coming off Blue Mountain, GA, (50 mile-marker) soreness in both knees forced him back to Pennsylvania. After two weeks of rest and recovery, Genesis returned to the trail of Georgia (March 23). Three days and 19.6 miles later, he realized that his knees were not going to support his trek. He returned to Pennsylvania with hopes of trying again in late April.

Zin Master started January 23 and went off-trail with tendinitis on February 27. He and his wife, Peaches, and dog, Moxie have recently traveled to Kingsport, Tennessee, where Zin is doing some day hikes.

Class Act

Class Act was hit hard by the cold temperatures and the overcrowded shelters. He was in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park when he realized that his slow pace was going to make his thru-hike impossible. Having begun his adventure on February 18, he jumped off the trail on March 16 having hiked about 182 miles of the AT, averaging a little more than 6.7 miles per day. He hopes to do some sections hikes I the near future.

Dave Snow and his dog, Abbie, began their thru-hike attempt on February 26th. I am assuming that they are off-trail because he has not entered a post for 16 days. I will continue to check his journal, but for now, I have noted that he is off-trail without comment.

Pigweed

The fifth hiker to recently call a halt to his hike is Pigweed, Lee Richards from Delaware. Pigweed began his AT adventure on February 27th, hiked 165 miles, and ended his hike at Fontana Dam just south of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. He suffered an ankle injury that would not respond to rest. He took four zero days at Wolf Creek Hostel near Stecoah Gap, North Carolina, but after returning to two painful days of hiking, Pigweed decided to head back home and seek doctor’s care.

I will post an update on the remaining nine hikers tomorrow (March 29). A few have not posted for several days but hopefully, they will all check in today.

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Class Act, Class of 2018, Genesis, Georgia, Hiking, Pigweed, Thru-Hike, Trail, Zin Master | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

AT Hikers: March 25th Update

I have been following several earlier starter on the Appalachian Trail. Here is an update on thier progress.

Genesis

Genesis

Rich Miller (Genesis) is a thru-hiker from Pennsylvania that began his hike in Harpers Ferry on January 14th. He hiked from West Virginia back to his home state through February and then headed to Georgia. He trekked in the Peach State for 6 days and then coming off Blue Mountain both his knees started to hurt, so he decided to drive back to PA to recoup (10-hour drive).  He is now back in Atlanta planning his return to the trail.

Zin Master – started January 23 is now OFF TRAIL – leg injury

Hard Knocks

Patrick Knox, tail name Hard Knocks, started on January 31. His journal has been silent since March 22nd when he was camping a Chatfield Shelter about 4 miles south of Atkins, Virginia. On the 22nd he posted,”Tomorrow I will try to make it to a town as it looks like there may be some big rain coming in on Saturday.” I am hoping that his silence means he has been enjoying so dry and warm rest in Atkins.

Hemlock Hollow Inn

Vagabond Jack

Jack Masters, from Kansas City, took his first steps on the famous Appalachian Trail on February 1. Vagabond Jack last post reflected a hostel about 15 miles north of Hot Springs at Allen Gap. He spent four zero-days there avoiding the winter storms and snow at Hemlock Hollow Inn. His last post on March 22nd“I decided to wait one more day before heading back out onto the trail. Besides giving my toe another day of healing, the weather should be a bit better. The sun finally came out today, and the snow is beginning to melt. I’ll be glad to get back out there instead of lazing around the hostel.” I am still waiting for an update from Vagabond. 

Opa

Opa’s Tent 3/25/18

Opa (Reinhard Gsellmeier), the retired engineer from Rochester, NY, began his thru-hike on February 10. Opa continues to hike through the winter weather and on March 25th he was camping at a stealth site 8.7 miles north of Pearisburg, Virginia (around mile-maker 640). He had wisely taken a zero-day in Pearisburg. On the 25th he hikes through a great deal of snow. He reached Rice Field Shelter around 2:30 but decided to push on a couple more miles and stealth camp. His words give insight into the difficulties of the AT in winter and the attitude to continue,  “Let me tell you it was very slow going as at this point I was on the ridgeline and the snow was deep. Staying on trail was also a challenge, and several times I had to rely on the Guthook GPS feature to keep me on trail. I found a good spot to camp, setup camp quickly, made dinner and hung my bear bag. I am now in my sleeping bag for the nite…. will wait for daylight before heading out. Aside from all the snow, it was a pleasant, sunny day today. I hope it continues. I didn’t pound out a lot of miles today, but am OK with that as it was slow going.”

Bamadog’s Igloo

Bamadog

Marty Dockins hit the trail on February 15th. His last post was from a hostel in Roan Mountain, Tennessee. His “sweetie” was meeting him at Roan Mountain and he was planning on a couple of days off trail. Three or four days ago on the trail he had an unwelcomed surprise, “Just made it to my campsite as it started to rain. It poured rain with thunder and lightning. When I woke up I was in an igloo. It had snowed 4 to 6 inches overnight.

Class Act

Class Act

Class Act, a Retired physician, Alan Conlon, took his first steps on the AT on February 18, 2018. Unfortunately, he decided to end his hike on March 14th. He had two days of very difficult hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Both days the temperatures were in the 20s and then at night, they dropped into the single digits. The snowy and slick trails made the elevation challenges even more difficult. His conclusion was that his pace was too slow to complete the journey.

Chip Tillson

Chip began his AT adventure on February 20, 2018. As of March 17, he has trekked over 200 miles and finds himself about half-way through the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. On March 16, he slipped on some mud and took a nasty fall, landing on his left elbow and wrenching his shoulder. He has taken six days off the trail at a friend’s home in Raleigh, NC, and is now making his way back to the trail. His elbow and shoulder are still sore but a doctor’s visit confirmed that there is nothing broken. March 25th was his first day back and he sloshed and slid 3.1 miles from Newfound Gap to Ice Water Shelter (appropriate name shelter for this time of year).

Sour Kraut

Tim Pfeiffer, who started on February 21st.  His photo journal makes it difficult to track his mileage but his last photos show him in Hot Springs around March 22nd.

Which Way hiking out of Newfound Gap 3/25/18

Which Way and Next Step

Darrell (Next Step) and Alicia (Which Way) Brinberry, retired military most recently stationed in Washington, DC, began their adventure on February 24th. They took two zero-days in Gatlinburg and then along with Chip Tillson (they do not mention meeting him), they left Newfound Gap on March 25 and hiked 8.5 miles to Peck Corner Shelter. They are sharing the shelter with at least ten other hikers and several mice scampering on the rafters – all trying to stay warm.

Dave and Abbie

Dave Snow and his dog (trail name Abbie) started the Appalachian Trail on February 26th. Dave’s last post was on March 11 when he and Abbie were taking a zero-day in Franklin. I will continue to check his journal but I think he is OFF TRAIL.

RTK’s Photo 3/18/18

RTK

Return To Katahdin (RTK), Bruce Matson is reporting his adventure in posts summarizing each week. He posts a week behind his current location so his last post reflects his journey through March 19.  He took the 16th  and 17th of March as zero-days in Gatlinburg and then returned to the Great Smoky Mountains Nation Park. He completed the park on the 19th and enjoyed a stay at Standing Bear Hostel just outside of the park.

Pigweed

Pigweed, Lee Richards, started with the approach trail from Amicalola Falls on February 26 and started accumulating AT miles on the 27th. Pigweed took four zero-days at Wolf Creek Hostel in hopes of nursing an injured an Achilles heel. He got back on the trail, hiked 8.5 miles but realized that the heel was not going to respond for the long haul. He has decided to get off the trail for now, head back to Delaware and evaluate a possible return as he rehabs the ankle.

Hickory

Hickory who began on February 26. On March 17th, Hickory has covered 255.9 miles of the Appalachian Trail. On March 24th (his last post) he was camping at Clyde Smith Shelter at mile marker 368. He did take his first zero-day in Erwin, TN on March 22nd. The cold weather is tough on all the thru-hikers. Hickory shared in his last post, “I am in another shelter, another winter storm, another cold night. In every journey moments arise which require “in-flight corrections” and reassessments. Extensive winter hiking was not anticipated for this journey. I will see what challenges Roan presents tomorrow, then plan day-by-day

Here is the latest mileage update for each hiker.

 

Last Post Mile Hiker Location Start Date
3/21/18 50.5 Genesis Atlanta 1/14/18
3/11/18 109.8 Dave and Abbie Franklin – OFF TRAIL 2/26/18
2/27/18 129.2 Zin Master OFF TRAIL 1/23/18
3/23/18 159.2 Pigweed Cable Gap -OFF TRAIL 2/27/18
3/16/18 182.5 Class Act OFF TRAIL 2/18/18
3/2518 209.8 Chip Tillson Ice Water Shelter GSMNP 2/29/18
3/25/18 217.2 Which Way/ Next Step Peck’s Corner Shelter GSMNP 2/24/18
3/19/18 240.8 RKT Standing Bear Farm 2/25/18
3/22/18 273.9 Sour Kraut Hot Springs 2/21/18
3/22/18 288.1 Vagabond Jack Allen Gap 2/1/18
3/24/18 368.1 Hickory Clyde Smith Shelter, TN 2/27/18
3/23/18 391.8 Bamadog Roan Mountain, TN 2/15/18
3/22/18 538.2 Hard Knocks Chatfield Shelter, VA 1/31/18
3/25/18 640.0 Opa North of Pearisburg, VA 2/10/18
Categories: Appalachian Trail, Atlanta, Class of 2018, Gatlinburg, Georgia, GSMNP, Hiking, Hot Springs, North Carolina, Pearisburg, Standing Bear Farm, Tennessee, Thru-Hike, Virginia | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

AT Thru-Hikers: March 11th Update

Here is an update on the 14 thru-hikers of theApplalchain Trail that I am following. All of them started the trail in January or February of 2018.

Genesis

Genesis

Rich Miller from Pennsylvania and his sister began their hike on January 14. They did some hiking in PA for a few weeks (from Harpers Ferry, WV up to Caledonia State Park, PA) logging in about 70 miles on the AT. They made their way to Springer Mountain, Georgia and began their NOBO hike on March 1. Coming off Blue Mountain on a very rainy Tuesday (March 8th) both his knees started to hurt, so they decided to drive back to PA to recoup (10-hour drive).  The plan to continue some more hiking on the AT in PA and then drive back to Unicoi Gap over Easter weekend and hike north once again.

Zin Master

Zin, Ken Nieland, decided to get off the trail on February 27 with tendinitis in his lower right leg. No update on his blog since then. I have not taken him off my official list, but silence is not a good sign.

Hard Knocks

Hard Knocks

Patrick Knox, tail name Hard Knocks, started on January 31. He experienced some AT winter weather on the 7th and 8th of March. On Wednesday (8th) he was greeted with cold temperatures and 6 inches on snow.  “… the trail footing was hard to see.  Needless to say, I fell down a couple of times but, thankfully, there are no injuries to report.” The next day the wind took over with major gusts that literally knocked him over. He stopped at a crossroad and got a shuttle to Doe River Hostel in Roam Mountain area. He was hoping to slackpack out of the hostel, but March 8th was his most current post.

Vagabond’s Shelter in GSMNP

Vagabond Jack

Jack Masters, from Kansas City, took his first steps on the famous Appalachian Trail on February 1, His last updated was on March 7th and he was camping at Newfound Gap with Okie, and Camo hoping to get to Gatlinburg but the road is closed because of the snow.

Opa

Opa’s Trail on March 8

Opa (Reinhard Gsellmeier), the retired engineer from Rochester, NY, began his thru-hike on February 10. He had been hiking as part of the Four Horsemen (including Jeep, Night Train, and Captain Blackbear). The four have now become the three as Jeep elected to stay in Erwin to heal from shin splints. They hit major weather as well as they spent the night at Roam High Knob Shelter (the highest shelter on the AT). ”Accumulations I’m estimating at 5-6”, with drifts up to a foot. Temperatures dropped steadily during the day as well. It was a difficult day, lots of climbing elevation and cold, windy, snowy…. I also had my first two slips and falls of the hike today. Nothing serious, I bounced back. I should put my microspikes on. Oh yeah, I mailed them back home when I was in Hot Springs.  Of the cohort that I am following, Opa has hiked the farthest at 434.5 miles. One interesting fact I learn about Opa this week: he was born in Munich, Germany,  and immigrated with his parents to the US in 1955 when I was three.

Bamadog

Bamadog at Rocky Top

Marty Dockins hit the trail on February 15th. His last post reflected his stay in Hot Springs, the first trail town along the trail, where the AT goes right down the main street of the community (Bridge Street). He hiked through knee-deep snow as well but enjoyed a nero of 3.2 miles from Deer Park Mountain Shelter to Hot Springs for a day of rest.

Class Act

Class Act

Retired physician, Alan Conlon, took his first steps on the AT on February 18, 2018. He has been doing some slack packing (carrying only what is needed for the day and utilizing the shuttle of a hostel to drop him off and/or pick him up after his day’s hike) for several days. Stationed at Wolf Creek Hostel in Stecoah Gap, Class Act has made good progress for the past three days. He met and had dinner with Chip Tillson on Saturday, March 10th. He has his eye on Fontana Dam as his destination for March 12.

Chip

Chip Tillson

Chip has experienced some of the attrition that occurs on the AT. In his journal he shares, “Several people I’ve hiked with have already left the trail. Among them: Georgia and Nick were rained out, Music Man got a bad toothache, Gabriel blew out his knee, Marbles got picked up in Franklin with a possible broken foot, Water Leaf just didn’t like climbing mountains, and today I learned John is headed home with a foot injury.”  A few days later he shared that his feet are bothering him, ”My feet have been sore the past couple of days and around noon I felt a growing pain in one foot.” He is planning two zero days followed by two days of slackpacking before he makes his way into the Smokies.

Sour Kraut Photo near Fontana Dam

Sour Kraut

Tim Pfeiffer, who started on February 21st.  His photo journal makes it difficult to track his mileage but his last photos show him in the Fontana Dam Area ready to enter the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Which Way headed up Albert Mountain

Which Way and Next Step

Darrell (Next Step) and Alicia (Which Way) Brinberry, retired military most recently stationed in Washington, DC, began their adventure on February 24th. I really enjoy reading their journal. They are so optimistic despite some a nagging toe blister and knee problems. They share about trail worship and God’s faithfulness which really pulls me into their adventure. They are staying at the Wayah Bald Shelter on Sunday, March 11.

No New Photos – Abbie

Dave and Abbie

Dave Snow and his dog (trail name Abbie) started the Appalachian Trail on February 26th and Abbie has been enjoying the outdoor environment. Dave seems to express a more pessimistic look at the trail with a little complaining attitude toward the accommodations and the weather. He and Abbie have spent six nights out of fourteen in hotels/hostels, so that are experiencing the inn-environment of the first two states more than some of the other hikers.

RTK

RTKs Tent

Return To Katahdin (RTK), Bruce Matson is reporting his adventure in posts summarizing each week. His last post covered his first week of hiking February 23-27. I now that he reached Dick’s Gap on March 3, but that is the latest update I have on my lawyer friend from Virginia.

Pigweed

Pigweed at Ga/NC border

Pigweed, Lee Richards, started with the approach trail from Amicalola Falls on February 26 and started accumulating AT miles on the 27th. As of March 10th, he was a Rock Gap having passed the 100-mile marker at Albert Mountain. He is beginning to have some physical problems. His journal on March 10th reflected some foot pain, “Unfortunately I strained my Achilles heel about halfway through the prior days 16-mile hike. Ibuprofen and general Slow Go hiking got me over Mount Albert and to the first Gap and Road. I decided to call a shuttle and get out at Rock Gap instead of continuing the next 3.7 miles to our destination with the rest of the Gang. I’ll pick that up when I resume the hike. I had planned to do a zero-day in Franklin anyway on Sunday. We’ll see if one zero-day is enough to heal up.”

Hickory

Hickory – does not post photos

Hickory began the same day as Pigweed but has walked at a much stronger pace. On March 11th, Hickory has covered 179.6 miles of the Appalachian Trail and has entered into the GSMNP (Smokies). He has only taken one nero-day (2 miles) in his first two weeks of hiking. He has thru-hiked the AT in 2011, so he probably knows his pace. I looked at my blog and on day 13 of my thru-hike, I camped at the same shelter, but Hickory is hiking through the winter weather and I was enjoying warmer spring temperatures and sunny skies.

He is the latest update on the hiker’s progress (not some posts are earlier than others).

Up Date Mile Marker Hiker Location Start Date
3/11/18 50.5 Genesis Poplar Stamp Gap 1/14/18
3/2/18 69.2 RTK Dick’s Creek 2/25/18
3/10/18 106 Pigweed Rock Gap 2/27/18
3/11/18 109.8 Dave and Abbie Franklin 2/26/18
3/11/18 120.8 Which Way/ Next Step Wayah Bald Shelter 2/24/18
3/11/18 129.2 Zin Master OFF Trail 1/23/18
3/11/18 150.7 Chip Tillson Stecoah Gap 2/20/18
3/11/18 158.4 Class Act Yellow Creek Road 2/18/18
3/9/18 165.5 Sour Kraut Fontana Dam Area 2/21/18
3/11/18 179.6 Hickory Russel Field (GSMNP) 2/27/18
3/7/18 206.8 Vagabond Jack Newfound Gap 2/1/18
3/11/18 273.9 Bamadog Hot Springs 2/15/18
3/8/18 376 Hard Knocks Roam Mountain Area 1/31/18
3/11/18 434.5 Opa Erwin, TN 2/10/18
Categories: Appalachian Trail, Class of 2018, Fontana Dam, Franklin, North Carolina, Gatlinburg, Georgia, GSMNP, Hiking, Hot Springs, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Roan Mountain, Rocky Top, Slackpack, Tennessee, Thru-Hike | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

AT Hikers: March 5th Update

Here is a quick update on the 14 AT thru-hikers that I am following this season.

Genesis and Sister

Genesis

Rich Miller from Pennsylvania established the earliest 2018 online journal of an attempted thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail (via trailjounrnals.com). He and his sister began their hike on January 14. They did some hiking in PA for a few weeks (from Harpers Ferry, WV up to Caledonia State Park, PA) logging in about 70 miles on the AT. They made their way to Springer Mountain, Georgia and began their NOBO hike on March 1. They have trekked another 45 miles from Springer and are camped at Poplar Stamp Gap.

Zin Master

Zin, Ken Nieland, decided to get off the trail on February 27 with tendinitis in his lower right leg. He is evaluating his future on the trail at his in-laws in Kingsport Tennessee. I have not taken him off my official list, but silence is not a good sign.

Hard Knocks

Hard Knocks

Patrick Knox, tail name Hard Knocks, started on January 31. He has experienced some backpack problems in the last week. His waist belt let loose causing his sternum strap to break. He made some on the trail repairs. He also experienced some muscle pain in his inner thigh running down to his knee. He took a zero-day (on March Saturday, March 3) and gave his body a rest.  The next day, he hiked 24 miles into Erwin, Tennessee, totally 341.5 miles on the AT.

Vagabond Jack

Vagabond Jack

Jack Masters, from Kansas City, took his first steps on the famous Appalachian Trail on February 1. He was in Fontana Dam (mile 165) on March 3rd about to enter the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Cell phone coverage is sometimes non-existent in this area, and he did not post in his journal for several days. He updated on March 6th and is camping in the GSMNP at Derrick Knob Shelter (mile 188.8).

Opa

Uncle Johnny’s Hostel

Opa (Reinhard Gsellmeier), the retired engineer from Rochester, NY, began his thru-hike on February 10. He has been recently hiking as part of the Four Horsemen (including Jeep, Night Train, and Captain Blackbear). They arrived at Ervin, Tennessee on March 5 and I am interested to see if Opa meets Hard Knocks at Uncle Johnny’s hostel. Opa shared in his journal some sad trail news. Uncle Johnny passed away suddenly about two weeks ago. His wife, Charlotte plans to continue running the hostel. I met Uncle Johnny on my hike and he will be missed by the hiking community.

Bamadog

Bamadog

Marty Dockins hit the trail on February 15th. His sweetheart met him at Newfound Gap (mile marker 206. 8) on March 4th and they spent a zero-day in Gatlinburg, TN on March 5. He lost cell phone coverage for 5 days but averaged 11.5 miles through the first part of the GSMPN (Smoky Mountains).

Class Act

Class Act

Retired physician, Alan Conlon, took his first steps on the AT on February 18, 2018. He has been very strategic in this first part of his hike. He has attempted to avoid the brutal weather but taking a few zero days (two at the Top of Georgia Hostel) but had begun to increase his distance per day with three 12-mile hikes before coming to Franklin, North Carolina. He is planning another zero-day in Franklin on the 6th of March.

Chip Tillson

Chip Tillson

Chip has not mentioned Class Act in his journal, but I think the road into Franklin together on a shuttle on Monday. Chip is planning on a zero-day on Tuesday as well so maybe they will connect. Chip began the trail on February 20th and this will be his first zero-day of his hike.  His pace has been conservative (7.8 miles per day) and he has taken two nero (near-zero) days of less than 4 miles. His consistent effort will begin to pay off with some trail legs and longer distances.

Sour Kraut

Sour Kraut

Tim Pfeiffer, who started on February 21st, is keeping more of a photo/video journal that a written daily entry. It is a little difficult to know exactly where he is, but his last photos seem to indicate that he summitted Siler Bald on March 3. He is enjoying hammock camping along the way.

Which Way and Next Step

Which Way and Next Step

Darrell (Next Step) and Alicia (Which Way) Brinberry, retired military most recently stationed in Washington, DC, began their adventure on February 24th. Their journal bursts with a great attitude and excitement about the trail. Which Way has recently developed a blister on the little toe that had caused some major discomfort. Isn’t it amazing how even the smallest of body parts can be so essential to a successful hike? They have persevered and have already logged in over 78 AT miles.

Abbie

Dave and Abbie

Dave Snow and his dog (trail name Abbie) started the Appalachian Trail on February 26th and Abbie was enjoying the outdoor environment. They made it to Dick’s Creek and the Top of Georgia Hostel on March 5th and spent the night in The Wolf Den which is set apart for hikers with dogs. Dave has plans to shuttle to a hotel in Hiawassee on March 6th.

RTK

RTK

Return To Katahdin (RTK), Bruce Matson was a special trail angel for me during my 2014 thru-hike of the AT. I have been following his preparation for the hike and was excited to follow his adventure. He started on February 24 by conquering the approach trail from Amicalola Falls to Springer Mountain plus the one mile of actual AT to the parking lot off USFS 42. I heard nothing from him since that first day and was concerned about his hike. He commented on this blog that he was indeed alive and well and that his posts were coming soon. On March 2 he was safe and sound at Dick’s Creek (about 70 miles along the trail). It is so good to hear that he is stepping out in a strong and consistent trek.

 

Pigweed

Pigweed

Pigweed, Lee Richards, also started with the 8.8-mile approach trail from Amicalola Falls. He began on February 26 and started accumulating AT miles on the 27th. As of March 5th, he has walked 52.9 and arrived at Unicoi Gap. He grabbed a ride into Helen, Georgia a Bavarian-style mountain town, where got a hotel room, enjoyed a long shower, washed his clothes and was looking forward to a great dinner with several other thru-hikers.

Hickory

Hickory

Hickory began the same day as Pigweed but has walked at a much stronger pace. On March 5th, Hickory has covered 87 miles of the Appalachian Trail and is camped at Standing Indian Mountain. He has taken one nero-day (a two-mile hike and stay at the Top of Georgia Hostel) but other than that short day, he has averaged 14.3 miles per day.

Up Date Mile Marker Hiker Location Start Date
3/5/18 44.6 Genesis Poplar Stamp Gap 1/14/18
3/5/18 52.9 Pigweed Unicoi Gap 2/27/18
3/2/18 69.2 RTK Dick’s Creek 2/25/18
3/5/18 69.2 Dave and Abbie Dick’s Creek 2/26/18
3/5/18 78.6 Which Way/ Next Step Bley Gap 2/24/18
3/5/18 87 Hickory Standing Indian Mt 2/27/18
3/5/18 109.8 Chip Tillson Franklin, NC 2/20/18
3/5/18 109.8 Class Act Franklin, NC 2/18/18
3/4/18 114 Sour Kraut Siler Bald 2/21/18
3/5/18 129.2 Zin Master Tellico Gap 1/23/18
3/5/18 188.8 Vagabond Jack Derrick Knob Shelter 2/1/18
3/5/18 206.8 Bamadog Gatlinburg 2/15/18
3/5/18 341.5 Opa Erwin, TN 2/10/18
3/4/18 341.5 Hard Knocks Erwin, TN 1/31/18

 

Categories: Amicalola Falls, Appalachian Trail, Erwin, Georgia, Hiking, Thru-Hike, Uncategorized, Uncle Johnny's Hostel | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Where Is Everyone on the Appalachian Trail?

I am tracking nine thru-hikers on the trail right now with at least four more to join them before the month of over. One, Genesis, started in West Virginia and is hiking north through Pennsylvania. He posts sporadically and as of February 18th, he had hiked about 79 miles. To help give you a visual on the journeys of the rest of the gang, I constructed the following table. The first column is an indicator of the first 200 miles of the AT. The second column is the miles hiked by a particular thru-hiker; the third is the name of the hiker; the fourth is the destination of each hiker on February 22; the last column is the date that each hiker began his adventure. (The last post by Hard Knocks was made on February 20 so he is, most likely, pushing his way through the Smoky Mountains where cell phone coverage is scarce.)

Miles Miles Hiked Hiker Destination Start Date
0 12.3 Sour Kraut Cooper Gap 2/21
  15.8 Chip Tillson Gooch Mt. 2/20
         
  31.7 Class Act Neel Gap 2/18
         
50        
         
  69.9 Bamadog Dick’s Creek 2/15
         
         
100        
  106 Zin Master Rock Gap 1/23
  114 Vagabond Jack Silar Bald 2/1
         
         
150        
         
  164.7 Opa Fontana Dam 2/10
         
         
200 199.1 Hard Knocks Clingman’s Dome 1/31

Four individuals were supposed to begin the hike since my last post. One hiker, Rogue Patriot was delayed waiting on his new tent to arrive in the mail. He hopes to hit the trail this Monday, February 26.  However, three others have officially joined the class of 2018.

Class Act

Class Act (Alan Conlon) began his adventure on February 18 and has hiked about 32 miles on the AT. He is a retired physician but is not a stranger to the trail. He took a leave of absence in 2014 (I did not meet him on the trail) to attempt a thru-hike. He completed 554 miles before an injury ended his hike. He is beginning his 2018 hike by utilizing a timeshare in Helen, GA. His wife is helping him slackpack along the way. He hiked 8.1 miles on day one; 7.6 on day two; and then 4.8 on day three having trekked over both the Sassafras and Justus Mountains and then meeting his wife at Woody Gap. They spent a zero-day together on the 21st in Dahlonega and then he hiked to Neel Gap on Thursday before his wife picked him up about 5:30.

Chip Tillson

On February 20, 2018, Chip Tillson (no trail, yet) hiked the approach trail from Amicalola Falls (8.1 miles to Springer Mountain) Unfortunately this mileage is on an approach trail and does not count as AT miles. Day two lead him 7.6 miles to Hawk Mountain Shelter. Day Three ended a Gooch Mountain after another 7+ mile day. I don’t know much about Chip background (hometown, age, or vocation) He mentions a special girl, Joyce, that I am assuming is his wife and his initial picture has a young man on his shoulders which looks like a son or a maybe a grandson.

Sour Kraut

Sour Kraut (Tim Pfeiffer) is the newest member of the cohort who started this past Wednesday, February 21. Sour Kraut hiked the approach trail as well so day one was only 0.3 miles on the AT. On day two he met a 70-year-old hiker, Dane, aka OG- old guy. He motivated Sour Kraut to hike up and over Sassafras Mountain and log in a 12-mile day. He ran into his first taste of trail blessing provided by “Snap” who offered fresh veggies and hummus. Sour Kraut is well on his way.

Zin Master

To quickly update the adventures of the others let me just give an insight from each. The chart above will tell you where they are. Zin Master, who was off-trail for over 2 weeks with blisters was hiked over 12 miles on two different days in the past week. He shares in his journal, “my feet have remained blister free now for 57 miles since I restarted…. If possible during the day I stop, change into dry socks and make any necessary adjustments to my taping. I’ve noticed the new boots becoming more and more comfortable as time goes on and hope the break in period is about over.”

Hard Knocks (still no photo), who started on January 31, is hiking very strong. He is somewhere in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. It has been several days since a post but on February 20, he was at Clingman’s Dome and the 200-mile mark of the trail.

Vagabond Jack

Vagabond Jack, continues to make progress. He is logging less than 10 miles per day, but he seems to be enjoying his adventure. On Thursday, Jack got a late start (11:30) and only covered 4.6 miles. But he also experienced part of the power of the trail, “As the trail passes near Siler Bald [his destination for the day], it enters what appears to be a pasture. A side trail to the left climbs to the top of the Bald, where camping is allowed. It’s a rather steep climb to the top; similar to walking up a ski slope. But the climb is more than worth it. I’m so glad I decided to make the journey, arriving about 4:00. I was blown away by the views from the top. Finally, I was on a mountain without it being covered in fog!”

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Four Horsemen -Opa on far left

Opa is putting in some nice mileage each day. He has found three other hiking buddies (Night Train, Jeep, and Captain Blackbeard) and they are calling themselves the four horsemen. “Each of us (the Four Horsemen) hikes at our own pace so we are scattered during the course of the day while hiking, but we have an agreed upon end of day destination.” They are taking a zero-day at Fontana Dam getting ready for the hike through the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Bamadog

Bamadog is making good progress although his journal is rather sketchy and short. He seems to enjoy finding stealth (unmarked) campsites so it is not easy to discern where he is along the trail He stayed at a hostel (Top of Georgia) on February 21 just a few miles from Dick’s Creek Gap. He shares, “Took a nero. It was a good chance to dry out wet gear and get a good meal.I will be in North Carolina tomorrow God willing!”

Categories: Appalachian Trail, Fontana Dam, Georgia, Gooch Mountain, GSMNP, Hiking, North Carolina, Thru-Hike, Trail Blessing | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

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